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Hi I have this method which I created. Its job is to receive an Integer A, which can either be 10 or 30. It is meant to return TRUE if the value is ten, and false otherwise.

public static boolean checkStatus(int a){
        if(a.equals(10)){
              return true;
        }
      return false;
    }

For some reason I am getting a compilation error in the if(a.equals(10)) condition, which says INT CANNOT BE DEREFERNCED. If I'm not mistaken, isn't the .equals() method the way to go in this circumstance?

Thanks for your help!

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4  
What does the compilation error tell you? – Sotirios Delimanolis Jul 10 '14 at 5:36
    
check edited, Sorry – user3029345 Jul 10 '14 at 5:38
    
if(a.equals(10)) is a string comparision. not for integers. please follow a==10 in your if condition – Narendra Pal Jul 10 '14 at 6:19
    
@NarendraPal No, it is not a string comparison, it's just an illegal method call. Even if s is a String, s.equals(10) is not a string comparison,; it always returns false without comparing anything. equals is a method that can apply to any object, not just strings. – ajb Jul 10 '14 at 6:27
    
@ajb Yeah!!!.my wrong! thanks – Narendra Pal Jul 10 '14 at 6:30
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Primitives in Java (int, long, float, etc..) don't have member methods, so the call

if (a.equals(10))

will not compile, as you're trying to de-reference a primitive. Instead, you want to use the == operator to compare primitive values:

if (a == 10)

and reserve the use of the equals() method for non-primitive Objects

share|improve this answer
    
Could you explain when the .equals() method would be appropriate. I keep forgetting this one :( Thanks! – user3029345 Jul 10 '14 at 5:37
    
@user3029345 You only should use .equals() when comparing Objects. – Joseph Boyle Jul 10 '14 at 5:39
    
@user3029345 I added a note to the bottom of the answer. In short, the equals method belongs to the Object cosmic superclass, and therefore all other classes in Java, since they must extend Object in their hierarchy chain, inherit some version of equals. All objects should be compared using this method, as comparing objects with == will only compare the references of the objects to see if the reference is pointing to the same place in memory (not exactly, but close enough). – Kon Jul 10 '14 at 5:39
1  
@user3029345 equals() should always be used instead of == for String, BigInteger, BigDecimal, and some other Java-defined classes. For other objects, equals() is appropriate if it makes sense for two different instances of a class to be "equal" somehow. It doesn't always make sense--what would it mean for two JComponents to be equal? When it does make sense, the class needs to define an equals method (and hashCode). Sometimes you still want to test whether two references refer to the same object; then use ==. Use == when comparing for null. – ajb Jul 10 '14 at 6:15

You can use equals for objects but an int is a primitive type (a), rather than an object.

Hence you need something like:

public static boolean checkStatus (int a) {
    if (a == 10)
        return true;
   return false;
}

or the shorter and more sensible (in this case):

public static boolean checkStatus (int a) {
    return (a == 10);
}

(a) The purists will argue this is proof that Java is not really an object-oriented language, but that's because they're raving loonies :-)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the shorthand (a == 10). Redundant if statements are useless. – Joseph Boyle Jul 10 '14 at 5:40
    
Just curious, is there no autoboxing for OPs case? – AntonH Jul 10 '14 at 5:42
    
where is the wrapper to box it? – Shail016 Jul 10 '14 at 5:43
    
@AntonH, autoboxing happens (for example) when you pass an int to a function expecting an Integer, or when you assign an int to an Integer variable. The OP's original if statement is neither of those. See docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/data/autoboxing.html for more detail. – paxdiablo Jul 10 '14 at 5:50
    
@paxdiablo Okay, thanks for the info. I thought it was all the time, but you learn something new every day. – AntonH Jul 10 '14 at 5:53

equals is used for non-primitives basically for Objects.

== is used for primitives.

So, you can use it

public static boolean checkStatus (int a) {
    if (a == 10)
        return true;
   return false;
}

Example 1: For object, if equals method are overridden, then "equals" method will return true.

public class Employee {
    int id;

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        Employee e = (Employee) obj;
        return id == e.id;
    }

    Employee(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Employee e1 = new Employee(5);
        Employee e2 = new Employee(5);
        System.out.println("e1.equals(e2) is: " + e1.equals(e2));
        System.out.println("(e1 == e2) is: " + (e1 == e2));
    }
}

Output:

e1.equals(e2) is: true

(e1 == e2) is: false

Example 2: For object, if equals method are not overridden, then "equals" method works as "=="

public class Employee {
    int id;

    Employee(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Employee e1 = new Employee(5);
        Employee e2 = new Employee(5);
        System.out.println("e1.equals(e2) is: " + e1.equals(e2));
        System.out.println("(e1 == e2) is: " + (e1 == e2));
    }
}

Output:

e1.equals(e2) is: false

(e1 == e2) is: false

Here "equals" method works as "==". So, don't forget to override the equals method for object.

share|improve this answer

You can use

public static boolean checkStatus(int a){
        if(a==10){
              return true;
        }
      return false;
    }

or

public static boolean checkStatus(Integer a){

        if(a.equals(new Integer(10))){
              return true;
        }
      return false;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure I'd create a whole new object in that second case when you could just do if (a.intValue() == 10). – paxdiablo Jul 10 '14 at 5:56

equals() method belongs to Object class of Java and it has to override each and every Object classes like String, Integer and MyObject(implemented class). But int is not a Java Object and there is no equals() method there.

you can just use == with int values and you can simplify your code as bellow.

public static boolean checkStatus(int a){
    return a==10;
}
share|improve this answer

int is a primitive in Java and primitives does not have behaviours a.k.a methods.

hence you cannot call .equals on int. So the options here are to use a ==

public static boolean checkStatus(Integer a){
  return (a==10);
}

or convert the int to Integer which is a wrapper class

public static boolean checkStatus(Integer a){
    return a.equals(10);
}
share|improve this answer

You can do something like this with Integer Class

  Integer x = 5;
  Integer y = 10;
  Integer z =5;
  Short a = 5;

  System.out.println(x.equals(y));  
  System.out.println(x.equals(z)); 
  System.out.println(x.equals(a));

Output:

  false
  true
  false
share|improve this answer

You can of course wrap the integer up as :

Integer i = new Integer(a);

Then the equals function can be used with 'i', the new Integer object.

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