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I understand how map works but I am confused by this example:

(def check-sum
     (fn [sequence]
       (apply + (map *
                     (range 1 (inc (count sequence)))
                     sequence))))

The map part looks like this when given a sequence:

(map * (range 1 (inc (count [5 1 1 4 7 7 1 3 1 0]))) [5 1 1 4 7 7 1 3 1 0])

Which returns this:

(5 2 3 16 35 42 7 24 9 0)

I do not understand where the current item in the map is being multiplied. I would understand if it was using an anonymous function of the form #(* %) etc.

But there is no anonymous function in this example.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first argument of map should be function and the number of parameter should be matched to the number of collections provided. So, if you want to pass an anonymous function, you should write the code like this:

(map #(* %1 %2) [1 3 5] [2 4 6])
;=> (2 12 30)
(map #(* %1 %2 %3) [1 3 5] [2 4 6] [3 5 7])
;=> (6 60 210)

But * itself is a function which can take any number of arguments (check (doc *) from REPL), you can write the code in a simpler form:

(map * [1 3 5] [2 4 6])
;=> (2 12 30)
(map * [1 3 5] [2 4 6] [3 5 7])
;=> (6 60 210)

* is applied to the set of first elements of each collection, set of second elements, ...

Other functions like +, -, / can be used in this way, too.

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No anonymous function is needed, because the named function * is what's doing the multiplying. Two collections are passed to map, so it passes the corresponding elements from each collection to the * function.

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