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Is there a Java Map keySet() equivalent for C++'s std::map?

The Java keySet() method returns "a set view of the keys contained in this map."

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1  
It's always confused me why there's no member function for this in std::map. I know it's simple to implement yourself, but so are a lot of things that did make it into the STL. I'd be curious to hear if anyone knows what the rationale was for not including it. –  Tyler McHenry Mar 18 '10 at 1:14
6  
@Tyler: Its not there because map is a container. It's sole purpose is to provide an associative container structure, and access to its contents. It is not responsible for providing all the neat'n'pretty little things one could do with it as a container, that is the task for algorithms and user defined code and not the container. –  Matthieu N. Mar 18 '10 at 1:51
    
@darid That does make sense, but then again there's std::string –  Tyler McHenry Mar 18 '10 at 2:10
    
@Tyler I agree with you, people who adore c++ must have some weird academic rationale (Objects must mirror real world Objects) behind omission. It however only makes lives of programmers difficult, both java and python have this capability. If such strict academic behavior was required i would use only lisp or haskell, Sadly i encountered this while doing a class project hence i dont have control over language. –  none Mar 18 '10 at 7:42
    
@darid by making user write that code, you are only encouraging errors. If we have to be pedantic about who does what, and ohter nitty-gritty we should code only in Lisp or Haskell or just Assembly. Java has it, Python has it, whats is the issue with C++ And yet C++ isn't completely object oriented, if its design committee wanted to be so pedantic! –  none Mar 18 '10 at 7:52
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5 Answers 5

All of the answers presented thus far end up creating a std::set directly, which may not be ideal: if you only want to be able to iterate over the keys, you don't want to have the overhead of creating a whole new container.

A more flexible option would be to use a transform iterator that converts a std::map iterator into some type of iterator that just yields the key when dereferenced. This is rather straightforward using the Boost Transform Iterator:

#include <functional>
#include <boost/iterator/transform_iterator.hpp>

// You may already have a select1st implementation; if not, you should :-)
template <typename Pair>
struct select1st
    : std::unary_function<const Pair&, const typename Pair::first_type&>
{
    const typename Pair::first_type& operator()(const Pair& p) const 
    { 
        return p.first; 
    }
};

template <typename C>
boost::transform_iterator<
    select1st<typename C::value_type>, typename C::const_iterator
> begin_keys(const C& c) 
{ 
    return boost::make_transform_iterator(
        c.begin(), select1st<typename C::value_type>()
    );
}

template <typename C>
boost::transform_iterator<
    select1st<typename C::value_type>, typename C::const_iterator
> end_keys(const C& c) 
{ 
    return boost::make_transform_iterator(
        c.end(), select1st<typename C::value_type>()
    );
}

With these utility functions, you can convert any range of std::map iterators (or iterators into any other pair associative container you may have) into a range of just the keys. As an example:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <map>

int main()
{
    std::map<int, int> m;
    m.insert(std::make_pair(1, 2));
    m.insert(std::make_pair(2, 4));
    m.insert(std::make_pair(3, 6));

    std::copy(
        begin_keys(m), end_keys(m), 
        std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ","));
}

This program outputs:

1,2,3,

If you really do want a std::set containing the keys, you can easily create one using these iterators:

std::set<int> s(begin_keys(m), end_keys(m));

Overall, it's a more flexible solution.

If you don't have Boost or don't want to use Boost or can't use Boost, this specific transform iterator can be implemented quite easily:

#include <iterator>

template <typename C>
class key_iterator
    : public std::iterator<
          std::bidirectional_iterator_tag, 
          typename C::key_type, 
          typename C::difference_type, 
          typename C::pointer, 
          typename C::reference
      >
{
public:

    key_iterator() { }
    explicit key_iterator(typename C::const_iterator it) : it_(it) { }

    typename const C::key_type& operator*() const  { return  it_->first; }
    typename const C::key_type* operator->() const { return &it_->first; }

    key_iterator& operator++() { ++it_; return *this; }
    key_iterator operator++(int) { key_iterator it(*this); ++*this; return it; }

    key_iterator& operator--() { --it_; return *this; }
    key_iterator operator--(int) { key_iterator it(*this); --*this; return it; }

    friend bool operator==(const key_iterator& lhs, const key_iterator& rhs)
    {
        return lhs.it_ == rhs.it_;
    }

    friend bool operator!=(const key_iterator& lhs, const key_iterator& rhs)
    {
        return !(lhs == rhs);
    }

private:

    typename C::const_iterator it_;
};

template <typename C>
key_iterator<C> begin_keys(const C& c) { return key_iterator<C>(c.begin()); }

template <typename C>
key_iterator<C> end_keys(const C& c)   { return key_iterator<C>(c.end());   }

The usage for this is the same as for the Boost version.

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1  
Hehe -- nice answer Mr. McNellis :) +1. –  Billy ONeal Feb 25 '11 at 6:44
    
Change your SO UN to @Jon Skeet. Then when someone presses the downvote it actually upvotes the post twice instead :) –  Matt Mar 1 '11 at 17:39
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Perhaps the following might be of use:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <map>
#include <set>
#include <string>

template< class Key, 
          class T, 
          class Comparator,
          class MapAllocator,
          class SetAllocator>
void make_key_set(const std::map<Key,T,Comparator,MapAllocator>& map, 
                  std::set<Key,Comparator,SetAllocator>& set)
{
   set.clear();
   typedef typename std::map<Key,T,Comparator,MapAllocator> map_type;
   typename map_type::const_iterator itr = map.begin();
   while (map.end() != itr)
   {
      set.insert((itr++)->first);
   }
}

int main()
{
  std::map<std::string, double> m;

  m["one"] = 1.1;
  m["two"] = 2.2;
  m["three"] = 3.3;

  std::set<std::string> key_set;

  make_key_set(m,key_set); 

  std::copy(key_set.begin(), key_set.end(),
            std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));

  return  0;
}

An overload for the make_key_set function taking STL compatible sequences such as std::vector, std::deque or std::list can be as follows:

template< class Key, 
          class T, 
          class Comparator,
          class MapAllocator,
          class SeqAllocator,
          template<class,class> class Sequence>
void make_key_set(const std::map<Key,T,Comparator,MapAllocator>& map, 
                  Sequence<Key,SeqAllocator>& sequence)
{
   sequence.clear();
   typedef typename std::map<Key,T,Comparator,MapAllocator> map_type;
   typename map_type::const_iterator itr = map.begin();
   while (map.end() != itr)
   {
      sequence.push_back((itr++)->first);
   }
}
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2  
my only issue is that this is a functionality which is frequently required, by not making it de facto part of STL. Only coding errors are encouraged. –  none Mar 18 '10 at 7:45
    
This is O(n*log(n)). You can make it O(n) by replacing set.insert((itr++)->first); with set.insert(set.end(),(itr++)->first); –  Notinlist Dec 18 '13 at 13:07
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you can implement it yourself:

vector<T> keys;
for (map<T,S>::iterator it=m.begin(); it!=m.end; it++)
  keys.push_back(it->first)
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2  
Why not make that std::set<T> keys to really match the functionality? –  R Samuel Klatchko Mar 18 '10 at 1:21
1  
keys() should be handy. but remember we get the keys because we want to process them later. e.g. we may need to iterate over the keys, then why not directly iterate over the map. –  Yin Zhu Mar 18 '10 at 1:47
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Here is a one-and-a-bit liner:

map<K,V> m;
...
// Useful stuff goes here
...
set<K> s;
transform(m.begin(), m.end(), inserter(s, s.begin()), select1st<pair<K,V> >());

If you don't have select1st:

template <class P>
struct select1st : public std::unary_function<P, typename P::first_type>
{
    const typename P::first_type& operator()(const P &arg) const { return arg.first; }
};
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Boost.Range provides this as boost::adaptors::map_values:

std::map my_map;
for (auto &value : my_map | boost::adaptors::map_values) {
    //...
}
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