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I want to create a simple app which runs in the background using a service.

Using SpeechRecognizer it would listen for application names, and when it finds existing one it would open it. Also if it does not find coincidence or the result is not clear, it would suggest some options showing them in a list or via voice.

I already know how to use SpeechRecognizer, but what I would need is to set this service to maintain running on background and avoid it from being killed. Could this be done?

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1  
So If you know how SpeechRecognizer works, what do you really need? How you tryed something? –  masmic Jul 10 at 11:28
    
I don't know how to make a broadcast reciever or an activity to do my work. and how an app can restrict android to kill it. when it needs resources –  Nepster Jul 10 at 11:30
    
Well then you should consider that you are not performing an specific question which we could solve, as you are asking for information about diferent topics. If you have an specific question, edit your question with it, otherwise, you should start reading android developers website where you have several tutorials about these things developer.android.com/training/index.html –  masmic Jul 10 at 12:26
    
Also, this is the reference post here to start using SpeechRecognizer as a service: stackoverflow.com/questions/14940657/… –  masmic Jul 10 at 12:34
    
What about using broadCast Reciever to do this work –  Nepster Jul 11 at 6:00

2 Answers 2

In addition to all this, I'd add at least this point:

SpeechRecognizer is better for hands-free user interfaces, since your app actually gets to respond to error conditions like "No matches" and perhaps restart itself. When you use the Intent, the app beeps and shows a dialog that the user must press to continue.

My summary is as follows:

SpeechRecognizer

  • Show different UI or no UI at all. Do you really want your app's UI to beep? Do you really want your UI to show a dialog when there is an error and wait for user to click?

  • App can do something else while speech recognition is happening

  • Can recognize speech while running in the background or from a service

  • Can Handle errors better

  • Can access low level speech stuff like the raw audio or the RMS. Analyze that audio or use the loudness to make some kind of flashing light to indicate the app is listening

Intent

  • Consistent, and easy to use UI for users
  • Easy to program

This is a work around for android version 4.1.1.

public class MyService extends Service
{
    protected AudioManager mAudioManager; 
    protected SpeechRecognizer mSpeechRecognizer;
    protected Intent mSpeechRecognizerIntent;
    protected final Messenger mServerMessenger = new Messenger(new IncomingHandler(this));

    protected boolean mIsListening;
    protected volatile boolean mIsCountDownOn;
    private boolean mIsStreamSolo;

    static final int MSG_RECOGNIZER_START_LISTENING = 1;
    static final int MSG_RECOGNIZER_CANCEL = 2;

    @Override
    public void onCreate()
    {
        super.onCreate();
        mAudioManager = (AudioManager) getSystemService(Context.AUDIO_SERVICE); 
        mSpeechRecognizer = SpeechRecognizer.createSpeechRecognizer(this);
        mSpeechRecognizer.setRecognitionListener(new SpeechRecognitionListener());
        mSpeechRecognizerIntent = new Intent(RecognizerIntent.ACTION_RECOGNIZE_SPEECH);
        mSpeechRecognizerIntent.putExtra(RecognizerIntent.EXTRA_LANGUAGE_MODEL,
                                         RecognizerIntent.LANGUAGE_MODEL_FREE_FORM);
        mSpeechRecognizerIntent.putExtra(RecognizerIntent.EXTRA_CALLING_PACKAGE,
                                         this.getPackageName());
    }

    protected static class IncomingHandler extends Handler
    {
        private WeakReference<MyService> mtarget;

        IncomingHandler(MyService target)
        {
            mtarget = new WeakReference<MyService>(target);
        }


        @Override
        public void handleMessage(Message msg)
        {
            final MyService target = mtarget.get();

            switch (msg.what)
            {
                case MSG_RECOGNIZER_START_LISTENING:

                    if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.JELLY_BEAN)
                    {
                        // turn off beep sound  
                        if (!mIsStreamSolo)
                        {
                            mAudioManager.setStreamSolo(AudioManager.STREAM_VOICE_CALL, true);
                            mIsStreamSolo = true;
                        }
                    }
                     if (!target.mIsListening)
                     {
                         target.mSpeechRecognizer.startListening(target.mSpeechRecognizerIntent);
                         target.mIsListening = true;
                        //Log.d(TAG, "message start listening"); //$NON-NLS-1$
                     }
                     break;

                 case MSG_RECOGNIZER_CANCEL:
                    if (mIsStreamSolo)
                   {
                        mAudioManager.setStreamSolo(AudioManager.STREAM_VOICE_CALL, false);
                        mIsStreamSolo = false;
                   }
                      target.mSpeechRecognizer.cancel();
                      target.mIsListening = false;
                      //Log.d(TAG, "message canceled recognizer"); //$NON-NLS-1$
                      break;
             }
       } 
    } 

    // Count down timer for Jelly Bean work around
    protected CountDownTimer mNoSpeechCountDown = new CountDownTimer(5000, 5000)
    {

        @Override
        public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished)
        {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        }

        @Override
        public void onFinish()
        {
            mIsCountDownOn = false;
            Message message = Message.obtain(null, MSG_RECOGNIZER_CANCEL);
            try
            {
                mServerMessenger.send(message);
                message = Message.obtain(null, MSG_RECOGNIZER_START_LISTENING);
                mServerMessenger.send(message);
            }
            catch (RemoteException e)
            {

            }
        }
    };

    @Override
    public void onDestroy()
    {
        super.onDestroy();

        if (mIsCountDownOn)
        {
            mNoSpeechCountDown.cancel();
        }
        if (mSpeechRecognizer != null)
        {
            mSpeechRecognizer.destroy();
        }
    }

    protected class SpeechRecognitionListener implements RecognitionListener
    {

        @Override
        public void onBeginningOfSpeech()
        {
            // speech input will be processed, so there is no need for count down anymore
            if (mIsCountDownOn)
            {
                mIsCountDownOn = false;
                mNoSpeechCountDown.cancel();
            }               
            //Log.d(TAG, "onBeginingOfSpeech"); //$NON-NLS-1$
        }

        @Override
        public void onBufferReceived(byte[] buffer)
        {

        }

        @Override
        public void onEndOfSpeech()
        {
            //Log.d(TAG, "onEndOfSpeech"); //$NON-NLS-1$
         }

        @Override
        public void onError(int error)
        {
            if (mIsCountDownOn)
            {
                mIsCountDownOn = false;
                mNoSpeechCountDown.cancel();
            }
             mIsListening = false;
             Message message = Message.obtain(null, MSG_RECOGNIZER_START_LISTENING);
             try
             {
                    mServerMessenger.send(message);
             }
             catch (RemoteException e)
             {

             }
            //Log.d(TAG, "error = " + error); //$NON-NLS-1$
        }

        @Override
        public void onEvent(int eventType, Bundle params)
        {

        }

        @Override
        public void onPartialResults(Bundle partialResults)
        {

        }

        @Override
        public void onReadyForSpeech(Bundle params)
        {
            if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.JELLY_BEAN)
            {
                mIsCountDownOn = true;
                mNoSpeechCountDown.start();

            }
            Log.d(TAG, "onReadyForSpeech"); //$NON-NLS-1$
        }

        @Override
        public void onResults(Bundle results)
        {
            //Log.d(TAG, "onResults"); //$NON-NLS-1$

        }

        @Override
        public void onRmsChanged(float rmsdB)
        {

        }

    }
}
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The "intent" using way to do this shows a window on the screen and requests user input, so If he wants to this process be automated he should use SpeechRecognizer. Also you should specify that the workaround (you should link the original post as I've done) is for the SpeechRecognizer –  masmic Jul 11 at 10:38
    
@masmic, see this codeproject.com/Articles/689451/… –  Rajeev Arora Jul 11 at 10:47
    
Yes I've readed several tutorials like that. Few months ago I've been developing an app in which I integrated Voice recognition. I started with the "intent" mode but this way it doesn't manage the errors so the user input is several times needed. I finally had to implement SpeechRecognition as is the only way at this moment to make something like this to be automated as this way it manages the errors and the user input is not needed. –  masmic Jul 11 at 11:10

As commented, I think that you don't need to use Broadcast Receiver for what you are trying to do. Instead you should define a service to be continuosly listening for speech. You can find a implementation here:

And for that about android killing services, you cannot prevent a service from being killed by the system, even system services can be killed.

Anyway, you can use the Service's startForeground() method:

By default services are background, meaning that if the system needs to kill them to reclaim more memory (such as to display a large page in a web browser), they can be killed without too much harm. You can set this flag if killing your service would be disruptive to the user, such as if your service is performing background music playback, so the user would notice if their music stopped playing.

You can see the implementation here.

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