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I'm developing a web app that can upload large file into the Azure Blob Storage.

As a backend, I am using Windows Azure Mobile Services (the web app will generate contents for mobile devices) in nodeJS.

My client can successfully send chunks of data to the backend, everything looks fine but, at the end, the uploaded file is empty. The data upload has been prepared by following this tutorial: it works perfectly when the file is small enough to be uploaded in a single requests. The process fails when the file needs to be broken in chunks. It uses the ReadableStreamBuffer from the tutorial.

Can somebody help me?

Here the code:

Back-end : createBlobBlockFromStream

[...]
            //Get references
            var azure = require('azure');
            var qs = require('querystring');
            var appSettings = require('mobileservice-config').appSettings;

            var accountName = appSettings.STORAGE_NAME;
            var accountKey = appSettings.STORAGE_KEY;
            var host = accountName + '.blob.core.windows.net';

            var container = "zips";
            //console.log(request.body);
            var blobName = request.body.file;
            var blobExt = request.body.ext;               
            var blockId = request.body.blockId;
            var data = new Buffer(request.body.data, "base64");
            var stream = new ReadableStreamBuffer(data);
            var streamLen = stream.size();

            var blobFull = blobName+"."+blobExt;
            console.log("BlobFull: "+blobFull+"; id: "+blockId+"; len: "+streamLen+"; "+stream);
            var blobService = azure.createBlobService(accountName, accountKey, host);
            //console.log("blockId: "+blockId+"; container: "+container+";\nblobFull: "+blobFull+"streamLen: "+streamLen);
            blobService.createBlobBlockFromStream(blockId, container, blobFull, stream, streamLen,
                function(error, response){
                    if(error){
                        request.respond(statusCodes.INTERNAL_SERVER_ERROR, error);
                    } else {
                        request.respond(statusCodes.OK, {message : "block created"});
                    }
                });
[...]

Back-end: commitBlobBlock

[...]
            var azure = require('azure');
            var qs = require('querystring');
            var appSettings = require('mobileservice-config').appSettings;

            var accountName = appSettings.STORAGE_NAME;
            var accountKey = appSettings.STORAGE_KEY;
            var host = accountName + '.blob.core.windows.net';

            var container = "zips";
            var blobName = request.body.file;
            var blobExt = request.body.ext;
            var blobFull = blobName+"."+blobExt;
            var blockIdList = request.body.blockList;
            console.log("blobFull: "+blobFull+"; blockIdList: "+JSON.stringify(blockIdList));
            var blobService = azure.createBlobService(accountName, accountKey, host);
            blobService.commitBlobBlocks(container, blobFull, blockIdList, function(error, result){
                if(error){
                    request.respond(statusCodes.INTERNAL_SERVER_ERROR, error);
                } else {
                    request.respond(statusCodes.OK, result);
                    blobService.listBlobBlocks(container, blobFull)
                }
            });
[...]

The second method returns the correct list of blockId, so I think that the second part of the process works fine. I think that it is the first method that fails to write the data inside the block, as if it creates some empty blocks.

In the client-side, I read the file as an ArrayBuffer, by using the FileReader JS API.

Then I convert it in a Base4 encoded string by using the following code. This approach works perfectly if I create the blob in a single call, good for small files.

[...]
//data contains the ArrayBuffer read by the FileReader API
var requestData = new Uint8Array(data);

var binary = "";
for (var i = 0; i < requestData.length; i++) {
    binary += String.fromCharCode( requestData[ i ] );
}
[...]

Any idea?

Thank you, Ric

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2 Answers 2

Which version of the Azure Storage Node.js SDK are you using? It looks like you might be using an older version; if so I would recommend upgrading to the latest (0.3.0 as of this writing). We’ve improved many areas with the new library, including blob upload; you might be hitting a bug that has already been fixed. Note that there may be breaking changes between versions.

Download the latest Node.js Module (code is also on Github) https://www.npmjs.org/package/azure-storage

Read our blog post: Microsoft Azure Storage Client Module for Node.js v. 0.2.0 http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazurestorage/archive/2014/06/26/microsoft-azure-storage-client-module-for-node-js-v-0-2-0.aspx

If that’s not the issue, can you check a Fiddler trace (or equivalent) to see if the raw data blocks are being sent to the service?

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I'm developing this service directly form Azure Web Portal... So i hope I'm using the newest version of the azure storage! I'll try to use Fiddler to check what happens when the Mobile Service sends the single blob block. –  Riccardo Cipolleschi Jul 14 '14 at 7:53
    
Well... By reading what fiddler does, I don't think it will useful: it will trace the traffic from my computer to the WebService. But I had printed the raw data blocks in the logger of the web service and I already knew that that file transfer is ok. What I don't know is if the web service sends the data to the blob storage.... –  Riccardo Cipolleschi Jul 14 '14 at 7:59
    
Just checking - I assume you're manually breaking the blob up into small enough blocks, and uploading each one with a separate call to createBlobBlockFromStream (same blob, different block ID), is that correct? It looks like that's what you're doing, because you later have a blockIdList, but I wanted to make sure. –  Adam Sorrin - MSFT Jul 15 '14 at 20:12
    
Yes Adam, this is what I do in the client side. I read the file, I slice it in chunks, I assign a blockId to every chunk, then I upload the chunks to the server. When all the chunks have been uploaded, I commit the blocks in a blob. I keep the block id list in the client and I send everything to my proxy server. Every call ends with success.. but, at the end, the file is empty... –  Riccardo Cipolleschi Jul 16 '14 at 16:17

Not too sure if your still suffering from this problem but i was experiencing the exact same thing and came across this looking for a solution. Well i found one and though id share.

My problem was not with how i push the block but in how i committed it. My little proxy server had no knowledge of prior commits, it just pushes the data its sent and commits it. Trouble is i wasn't providing the commit message with the previously committed blocks so it was overwriting them with the current commit each time.

So my solution:

var opts = {
    UncommittedBlocks: [IdOfJustCommitedBlock],
    CommittedBlocks: [IdsOfPreviouslyCommittedBlocks]
}
blobService.commitBlobBlocks('containerName', 'blobName', opts, function(e, r){});

For me the bit that broke everything was the format of the opts object. I wasn't providing an array of previously committed block names. Its also worth noting that i had to base64 decode the existing block names as:

blobService.listBlobBlocks('containerName', 'fileName', 'type IE committed', fn)

Returns an object for each block with the name being base64 encoded.

Just for completeness here's how i push my blocks, req is from the express route:

var blobId = blobService.getBlockId('blobName', 'lengthOfPreviouslyCommittedArray + 1 as Int');
var length = req.headers['content-length'];
blobService.createBlobBlockFromStream(blobId, 'containerName', 'blobName', req, length, fn);

Also with the upload i had a strange issue where the content-length header caused it to break and so had to delete it from the req.headers object.

Hope this helps and is detailed enough.

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