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The asm code below was generated using gcc -O4 .. on x64 osx which optimised it (please have a look at gcc manual for more information on -O4).

(gdb) disas main
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x0000000100000f50 <+0>: push   rbp
   0x0000000100000f51 <+1>: mov    rbp,rsp
   0x0000000100000f54 <+4>: lea    rdi,[rip+0x2f]    # 0x100000f8a
   0x0000000100000f5b <+11>:    lea    rsi,[rip+0x2b]    # 0x100000f8d
   0x0000000100000f62 <+18>:    xor    eax,eax
   0x0000000100000f64 <+20>:    pop    rbp
   0x0000000100000f65 <+21>:    jmp    0x100000f6a

I am trying to understand the flow of the code at line main+21 and onwards. I tried the following but could not find out how to see the code at 0x100000f6a (and onwards):

(gdb) disas 0x100000f6a
No function contains specified address.
(gdb) x/8 0x100000f6a
0x100000f6a:    0x00a025ff  0x8d4c0000  0x0000911d  0xff534100
0x100000f7a:    0x00008125  0x00689000  0xe9000000  0xffffffe6

So, as I understand, the code at main+21 makes a jump to address 0x100000f6a. But, how do I see what's in 0x100000f6a and beyond? I know that for this exercise that it's a JMP to printf function. I would like to see the entire function (if possible).

Edit 1:

As per @klaus's suggesstion, I tried single stepping the code after setting a breakpoint @ the line JMP 0x100000f6a but I get Input/output error. :

(gdb) disas
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x0000000100000f50 <+0>: push   rbp
   0x0000000100000f51 <+1>: mov    rbp,rsp
   0x0000000100000f54 <+4>: lea    rdi,[rip+0x2f]    # 0x100000f8a
   0x0000000100000f5b <+11>:    lea    rsi,[rip+0x2b]    # 0x100000f8d
   0x0000000100000f62 <+18>:    xor    eax,eax
   0x0000000100000f64 <+20>:    pop    rbp
=> 0x0000000100000f65 <+21>:    jmp    0x100000f6a
End of assembler dump.
(gdb) step 1
Warning:
Cannot insert breakpoint 0.
Error accessing memory address 0x0: Input/output error.

0x00007fff9129e5fd in ?? ()
(gdb) step 1
Cannot find bounds of current function
(gdb) bt
#0  0x00007fff9129e5fd in ?? ()
#1  0x0000000000000000 in ?? ()
(gdb) c
Continuing.
hello
[Inferior 1 (process 1620) exited with code 05]

I need to use stepi as per @jester's suggestion instead of step 1 because stepi works on instruction wherease step on source (which is incorrect in my case).

Edit 2:

Same code on x86 linux (yes gcc -O4 .. as well) gets relocated? correctly:

(gdb) disas main
Dump of assembler code for function main:
  0x08048350 <+0>:  push   ebp
  0x08048351 <+1>:  mov    ebp,esp
  0x08048353 <+3>:  and    esp,0xfffffff0
  0x08048356 <+6>:  sub    esp,0x10
  0x08048359 <+9>:  mov    DWORD PTR [esp+0x8],0x8048500
  0x08048361 <+17>: mov    DWORD PTR [esp+0x4],0x8048506
  0x08048369 <+25>: mov    DWORD PTR [esp],0x1
  0x08048370 <+32>: call   0x8048340 <__printf_chk@plt>
  0x08048375 <+37>: leave
  0x08048376 <+38>: ret
End of assembler dump.
(gdb) x/32 0x8048340
0x8048340 <__printf_chk@plt>:   -1610078721 275253252   -385875968  -64
0x8048350 <main>:   -2082109099 -326897436  608487184   75825160
0x8048360 <main+16>:    608487176   75826692    604292872   1
0x8048370 <main+32>:    -13336  -1866216961 -1990267599 -253459487
0x8048380 <_start+8>:   1750226000  134513824   75772008    1750487304
0x8048390 <_start+24>:  134513488   -26648  -1869548289 -1869574000
0x80483a0 <__do_global_dtors_aux>:  1407551829  -2147160957 77599805    1064632328
0x80483b0 <__do_global_dtors_aux+16>:   77600929    -1625244920 -343865340  134520604

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
1  
You can use x/i to disassemble arbitrary address. That said, I expect you loaded the binary wrong somehow, so that relocations did not occur. –  Jester Jul 10 '14 at 14:39
    
oh really? I used: gcc -g -O4 hello.c -o hello. Then gdb ./hello. –  gumchew Jul 10 '14 at 14:42
    
why you don't set a break at the jmp and do a single step inside your function. That should work also if no sources of your function are present. And you can see that the relocation was done correctly. –  Klaus Jul 10 '14 at 14:46
    
The address in question is the very next instruction, it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to jump there. Your memory dump shows the bytes ff 25 a0 00 00 00 which decodes to jmpq *0xa0(%rip),another jump. Presumably this goes to the actual printf through a pointer. Still don't understand why optimized code jumps to a jump. *Unless this is a section crossing, and it's already the plt. Then it makes sense. Note you can use gcc -O4 -S to get assembly listing, that might tell you a little more. –  Jester Jul 10 '14 at 14:49
    
You need to use stepi (si) to step instructions. –  Jester Jul 10 '14 at 15:06

1 Answer 1

Please try to link statically and see if this happens again. The fact your jump land on another jump looks like a PLT:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Position-independent_code#Technical_details

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. i am looking into clang way of doing static linking. Also, thanks for linking to the article. –  gumchew Jul 10 '14 at 15:43
    
i am on osx and so far i can't find a way to statically link a binary. got any pointers? –  gumchew Jul 11 '14 at 10:48
    
ok. i am lost. there is no straight-forward way I can build statically linked binary on osx because apple doesn't provide statically linked library for C startup (crt0.o). sigh. –  gumchew Jul 11 '14 at 12:42

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