Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm working thru a HTML5 projects course right now on Udemy.com and the guy's example code has this:

//Use a timer to call paint function
        if(typeof game_loop != "undefined") clearInterval(game_loop);
        game_loop = setInterval(paint, speed);

I thought 'if' statements had to have curly braces so the code inside can run if the the 'if' statment is true. Please advise. Thanks

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Kay, Niet the Dark Absol, Matt Jul 10 at 15:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

8  
Not needed as long as you only need 1 statement to execute but better to have them for readability –  Huangism Jul 10 at 15:34
    
Holy smokes, I just barely posted this 1 min ago and have a bunch of responses. Actually I apologize, i just did a search and found this answer above. Thanks Huangism. –  user3791854 Jul 10 at 15:37
    
@Smeegs edited, I was going to put statement at first –  Huangism Jul 10 at 15:37
    
As a side note about conventions, some people omit braces if the entire expression including the if (if (condition) do_something();) fits on a single line. As soon as do_something() is too long to go on the same line, many people will add braces for readability even though they are not needed. –  Elise Jul 10 at 15:37
    
Thanks this feels like a huge step in my understanding of JS. –  user3791854 Jul 10 at 15:40

5 Answers 5

Your example code is syntactically correct. You may omit the brackets assuming you have a single line of code after your if/else statement.

if (condition)
    //Do something
else
    //Do something

Many folks, including myself, loath this practice. Check out further discussion here:

share|improve this answer
    
I second this, it just invites problems down the line. Keep the code clean and readable. –  Smeegs Jul 10 at 15:35
    
Wasn't there a motion in ECMAScript Harmony to allow if condition { … }, i.e. omitting the parentheses? Does anyone know what became of that? –  Kay Jul 10 at 15:44
    
Many folks appreciate this practice when used sensibly, as it reduces noise. –  cookie monster Jul 10 at 15:46
    
@cookiemonster, which is why I said many folks, not all folks. Not sure that's worth a downvote. I think you should read up on the guidelines for downvoting: stackoverflow.com/help/privileges/vote-down –  James Hill Jul 10 at 15:47
    
Because it's a mere opinion that degrades the quality of the answer. Also to say you may omit the brackets assuming you have a single line of code isn't correct. You may have multiple lines as long as they form a single statement. And the brackets aren't part of the if statement to begin with, so it's not a question of omitting them. It's a question of what type of statement is used. The quality of the answer earned my down vote. –  cookie monster Jul 10 at 15:51

You can use if with any single statement, whether that statement is a block statement or any other kind.

The grammar for the if statement in ECMAScript is:

IfStatement :

    if ( Expression ) Statement else Statement
    if ( Expression ) Statement

Notice that there are no curly braces defined. Any valid statement is permitted.

This:

 if (condition)
     then_case();
 else
     else_case();

evaluates the same as this:

 if (condition) {
     then_case();
 } else {
     else_case();
 }

If your have multiple statements, then you need a block statement in order to contain them.

 if (condition) {
     then_case();
     also_this();
 } else {
     else_case();
     also_that();
 }

Sometimes you see things like

 if (condition)
      then_case(), also_this();

which evaluates, but is ugly. (Best just forget my last example. :-) )

share|improve this answer
    
@cookiemonster, sorry there was no warning that I overwrote your changes. –  Kay Jul 10 at 15:40
    
No problem. :-) –  cookie monster Jul 10 at 15:42

Similar to other 'c' syntax languages, the scope of the context may be omitted if the statement is only a single line.

e.g.

if(true)
    alert('hello');

is equal to

if(true) alert('hello');

is equal to

if(true){ alert('hello'); }

You may also see another form

var myBool = Boolean(someValue) ? false : true
share|improve this answer
1  
This is my favorite answer. Thanks, I don't have a high enough reputation yet to upvote this. –  user3791854 Jul 10 at 15:46
    
Thank you for your kind words! –  Jay Jul 10 at 16:39

If you have only one statement to be part of body of if or else, then curly braces are optional. But if you want group of statements to be part of if or else's body then it is mandatory to have curly braces.

if(condition)
    //Only one statement
else if(condition2)
    //Only one statement
else
    //Only one statement

But in the following it is mandatory to have curly braces.

if(condition){
    //first statement
    //second statement
    .....
    //nth statement
}
else if(condition2){
    //first statement
    //second statement
    .....
    //nth statement
}
else{
    //first statement
    //second statement
    .....
    //nth statement
}

And please note, it is not only for JavaScript, it is same behavior in most of the programming languages as well, like C, C++, Java etc.

share|improve this answer

You don't need the curly braces for a one-line consequence of the if statement. But if the consequence of the if statement is multiple statements, then you wrap them in curly braces to identify them as such.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.