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I just can't seem to grok the appropriate bindings in Angular directives. I have the following code:

html

<div ng-app="choreApp">
    <div ng-controller="ChoreCtrl">
        <div ng-repeat='chore in Chores'>
          <h2 announce clicky-thing='updateName({chore: chore})' style='color: {{chore.color}}'>{{chore.name}} <== chore </h2>   
        </div>

        <hr />
        <input type="text" ng-model='chore.name' />
        <input type="text" ng-model='chore.color' />
        <br />
        <button ng-click='updateName({chore: chore})'>Update Name to {{Chore.name}}</button>




     </div>
</div>

// javascript

var app = angular.module("choreApp", []);

app.controller("ChoreCtrl", function ($scope) {
    $scope.Chores = [
        {name: 'Dude', color: 'blue'},
        {name: 'Guy', color: 'black'},
        {name: 'Dudette', color: 'red'},
        {name: 'Gal', color: 'orange'}
    ];


    $scope.updateName = function (chore) {
        alert('okay ' + chore.name);
    };
});


app.directive("announce", function () {
    return {
        restrict: "A",
        scope: {
            clickyThing: '&'
        },
        link: function (scope, elem, attrs) {

            elem.bind('click', function () {
                scope.clickyThing({chore: chore});
            });
        }
    };
});

JSFiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/k8xYX/14/

There are four h2, each which are bound to their own chore object. What I want is to be able to click one of the h2's, bind that individual chore to the controller's scope (and fill in the inputs with the chore's model data), make an update to one of the input elements, click the 'Update Name' button and have that model data update the h2 that was clicked.

share|improve this question
    
first of all your output is Dude <== chore, Guy <== chore.... is it right? or it should be Dude<==Blue, Guy<==Black?? –  micronyks Jul 10 at 16:29
    
the output is weird (it's the result of a weird journey in this code), but it's correct. It could easily be changed to <=== {{chore.color}} and be fine –  Bryce Jul 10 at 16:30
    
your object is {chore: chore}, therefore you should reference in the alert as chore.chore.name rather than chore.name. –  Kevin B Jul 10 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is an updated fiddle:

Fiddle

Updated Directive:

app.directive("announce", function () {
    return {
        restrict: "A",
        scope: {
            clickyThing: '&',
            chore: '='
        },
        link: function (scope, elem, attrs) {
            var chore = scope.chore;
            elem.bind('click', function () {

                scope.clickyThing(chore);
            });
        }
    };
});

Problems addressed:

  1. You've declared an isolated scope for the announce directive, but haven't imported the 'chore' model into your isolated scope - yet you reference chore when you execute the clickyThing(). I've changed it so that your directive imports the 'chore' model.
  2. You use { chore: chore } as the model passed to your click handlers - this is not necessary. I've changed this so that it passes the model directly.
  3. Within the updateName() method, its being called from outside the Angular context, so I've wrapped the assignment of chore in an $apply block. This ensures that a $digest is triggered after the execution of the code.

I agree with Kevin, you should probably use ng-click instead.

share|improve this answer
    
have you check your fiddle? –  micronyks Jul 10 at 17:18
    
it gives $digest error when clicking on update to button after changing the color value. –  micronyks Jul 10 at 17:19
    
the $scope.$apply (and associated explanation) helped a lot. Is it idomatic to define a model within a method? Would it be better to define $scope.chore under $scope.Chore (appreciating that it's bad naming)? –  Bryce Jul 10 at 17:19
    
Yes, defining models and assigning them to scope is idiomatic inside a controller. Alternatively, the model can come from a service/factory - also acceptable and good practice. I would use lower-case for model names as a naming convention. –  pixelbits Jul 10 at 17:24
    
Yes i must appreciate the way example has been done by poxelbits. & its pretty working well. no problem. but what if I change color and press below button? it give $diegest error which is wrong. –  micronyks Jul 10 at 17:26

your object is {chore: chore}, therefore you should reference in the alert as chore.chore.name rather than chore.name.

$scope.updateName = function (chore) {
    alert('okay ' + chore.chore.name);
    //$scope.Chore.color = 'pink';
};

Alternatively you could change the way you're passing it in:

clicky-thing='updateName(chore)'

Additionally, $scope.clickyThing actually references an executable function that contains a function created using the text inside of the clicky-thing attribute, you just need to execute it without any arguments.

elem.bind('click', function () {
    scope.clickyThing();
});

http://jsfiddle.net/k8xYX/16/

Unless you're doing more than executing the passed in code though, you should probably instead simply use an ng-click.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the ng-click in this example. The example is contrived and representative of a bigger solution. –  Bryce Jul 10 at 17:12

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