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Basic question here, with (hopefully) a simple answer: I'm trying to write a function whose first argument is a std::array, but with an arbitrary size.

void f(array<int> x) {
    //do stuff
}

isn't valid, because I need a size for array<int, #>. Is there a way to get around this?

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marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ, lpapp Jul 11 '14 at 2:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Please pay particular attention to this section stackoverflow.com/a/4810672/2296458 –  CoryKramer Jul 10 '14 at 17:30
4  
@Cyber no, that is not a duplicate... did you even read the linked question and answer? The linked question is about C style arrays. –  Theolodis Jul 10 '14 at 17:32
    
Do you know the size of the array at compile time? –  Scis Jul 10 '14 at 17:33
    
In this case, yeah. –  CSGregorian Jul 10 '14 at 17:34
1  
@CSGregorian then go with Quentin's answer :) –  Scis Jul 10 '14 at 17:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The only way is to make f a function template :

template <size_t N>
void f(array<int, N> x) {
    //do stuff
}
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Quentins answer is correct if you do not need to be flexible at run-time.

However, if you need to be flexible at run-time I would recommend you to use an std::vector instead.

void f(vector<int> x) {
    //do stuff
}

Also, you might want to use a reference or const reference to avoid the copying of the array or vector, at least if you do not need the copy.

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A second way around it, is using the function template (@Quentin) and delegate to a non template function:

#include <array>

void g(int* first, int* last) {
    //do stuff
}

template <size_t N>
inline void f(std::array<int, N> x) {
    g(x.begin(), x.end());
}
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1  
And what is the concrete benefit of the non template function? –  Theolodis Jul 10 '14 at 17:39
2  
@Theolodis: The implementation can be in a source file. –  Dieter Lücking Jul 10 '14 at 17:42
1  
@Theolodis 'And what is the concrete benefit ...?' The non template function is a bit more generic, and no longer depends on the compile time provided size_t N. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 10 '14 at 18:04
    
@πάνταῥεῖ ok, I didn't think of that... Actually it could even be used with the vector solution I proposed too. –  Theolodis Jul 10 '14 at 18:08
1  
Or you could just call g() directly without bothering with f(). :) –  ppl Jul 10 '14 at 21:05

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