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You have an i by j matrix. For the purposes of this example, take the following (very small) matrix. However, the algorithm should be fast and scalable.

values <- c(2,5,3,6,7,
            9,5,4,9,9,
            1,5,4,8,1,
            3,1,5,6,2,
            2,9,4,7,4)
my.mat <- matrix(values, nrow = 5, byrow = TRUE)

Objective: Iteratively remove rows or columns from my.mat such that mean(c(apply(my.mat, 1, min), apply(my.mat, 2, min))) is minimized given the number of rows and columns remove. Do so greedily (so once a column or row is removed, it never returns to the matrix). In other words, simply remove the rows or columns with the largest minimum value. The following caveats apply.

First, if removing a row or column changes the minimum value of a column or row (i.e., if they are each others minimum values), remove the (row, column) pair. If a row or column is paired with multiple columns or rows, iteratively remove the additional columns or rows until the pairing is 1:1, then remove the remaining pair simultaneously. Second, where there are ties, select randomly.

Output: A vector that indicates the order of removal according to this objective. It can either reference the row/column names or it can reference the cell values, so long as it implies the correct order of removal.

So for the matrix above, a correct answer is...

(Column 4), (Row 2), (Column 3), (Either Row 1 or Row 5), (Row 5 or Row 1), (Column 1 or Column 5), (Row 4 and Column 2), (Column 5 or Column 1 AND Row 3)

However, the actual implementation shouldn't be undetermined. For instance, it should randomly choose Row 5 or Row 1, then remove the remaining row in a later step when appropriate.

It's very easy to imagine a very sloppy solution to the problem. However, it is hard to imagine a fast, vectorized solution.

If there were no ties where columns and rows are not paired with each other and if there were not instances of multiple rows or columns paired with a single column or row, you could simply sort the unique row and column minima, then iteratively remove the rows and columns with minimum values equal to the i th value in the sorted minima. However, when there are ties, like in my.mat, this breaks because it would unnecessarily remove rows and columns that don't change the minima of a corresponding column or row. For instance, if a row is paired with two columns, they would all have equal minima, and so this crude algorithm would remove the row and both columns, when the correct answer is to remove at random one of the columns, then to remove both the remaining column and row. One potential solution to this problem is to jitter the values such that the correct ordering is implied, but as the matrix gets large, it becomes difficult to ensure that the jittering won't lead to incorrect orderings.

EDIT 1: Explaining the example

AndrewMacDonald raised a question about the example, so I'll explain the ordering.

The minima for each row and column is as follows, where Ci, Ri are the i th columns, rows.

C4 R2 C3 R1 R5 R3 R4 C1 C2 C5 
 6  4  3  2  2  1  1  1  1  1 

The first three steps are easy. C4, R2, and C3 are not minima for other rows or columns, nor are there any ties. So, steps 1 - 3...

The full matrix:

   C1 C2 C3 C4 C5
R1  2  5  3  6  7
R2  9  5  4  9  9
R3  1  5  4  8  1
R4  3  1  5  6  2
R5  2  9  4  7  4

1) Remove C4.

   C1 C2 C3 C5
R1  2  5  3  7
R2  9  5  4  9
R3  1  5  4  1
R4  3  1  5  2
R5  2  9  4  4

2) Remove R2

   C1 C2 C3 C5
R1  2  5  3  7
R3  1  5  4  1
R4  3  1  5  2
R5  2  9  4  4

3) Remove C3

   C1 C2 C5
R1  2  5  7
R3  1  5  1
R4  3  1  2
R5  2  9  4

Then, there is a tie between R1 and R5 (both have a minimum of 2). They obviously aren't paired with each other nor are they minima for any columns, so we can remove them one at a time without changing the minima of any other row or column. We randomly pick between the two to determine the order.

4) Row 1 or Row 5 (I'll arbitrarily pick row 1)

   C1 C2 C5
R3  1  5  1
R4  3  1  2
R5  2  9  4

5) Row 5 or Row 1 (whichever wasn't picked in step 4)

   C1 C2 C5
R3  1  5  1
R4  3  1  2

The remaining rows and columns are tied = 1. You can't remove R3 because then C1 or C5 would get worse. But you can remove either C1 or C5 and not make R3 worse. Similarly, you can't remove R4 or C2 without making the other worse. So we'll have to remove R4 and C2 simultaneously.

The final few steps are then, remove one of either C1 or C5, then the remaining two pairs (R4 and C2, R3 and the remaining of either C1 OR C5).

6) C1 or C5 (I'll arbitrarily pick C5)

   C1 C2
R3  1  5
R4  3  1

7) R4 and C2

   C1 
R3  1 

8) R3 and the remaining of either C1 or C5

[]

NOTE: Steps 7 and 8 are actually interchangeable. Again, randomly pick between them.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand. three columns (cols 1, 2, and 5) and two rows (3 and 4) have the same minima, 1. How did you decide on the order of removal? shouldn't the third-to-last element in your answer above be (Column 1 or Column 5 or Column 2)? – AndrewMacDonald Jul 10 '14 at 18:34
    
Removing Column 2 would make Row 4 worse, so we have to remove them as a pair. See the explanation that I added in response to your question. Thanks! – Henry David Thorough Jul 10 '14 at 19:29
    
What do you mean by rows or columns becoming "worse"? – AndrewMacDonald Jul 10 '14 at 19:49
    
ah, I get it -- when the minima for a column is equal to the minima of a row, they have to both leave together. – AndrewMacDonald Jul 10 '14 at 19:52
    
Right, so long as there isn't another column or row with which it has the same value (like row 3). – Henry David Thorough Jul 10 '14 at 19:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

There is actually no need to do anything iteratively, since the minima of a vector cannot change when something is removed. Therefore we can reduce this problem to consider just the minimum value of rows and columns. That reduces the size of the problem and should make the solution faster and scalable

Throughout this answer I use dplyr and tidyr, two packages for manipulating data.

step 1: making the dataframe(s)

The first step is to find the minima of every row and column, and keep these in a data.frame. There are probably more elegant ways of doing this, but here is one approach:

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)


colmins <- lapply(1:ncol(my.mat),function(s){col <- my.mat[,s,drop = FALSE]
                                             which(col == min(col), arr.ind = TRUE)}
)

cs_pos <- data.frame(name = rep(paste0("c",1:ncol(my.mat)),
                                times = sapply(colmins,nrow)),
                     do.call(rbind,colmins),
                     stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

rowmins <- lapply(1:nrow(my.mat),function(s){row <- my.mat[s,,drop = FALSE]
                                             which(row == min(row), arr.ind = TRUE)}
)

rs_pos <- data.frame(name = rep(paste0("r",1:nrow(my.mat)),
                                times = sapply(rowmins,nrow)),
                     do.call(rbind,rowmins),
                     stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

cs_val <- data.frame(type = "c", name = paste0("c",1:ncol(my.mat)),
                     val = apply(my.mat,2,min),
                     stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

rs_val <- data.frame(type = "r", name = paste0("r",1:ncol(my.mat)),
                     val = apply(my.mat,1,min),
                     stringsAsFactors = FALSE)


cs <- cs_pos %>%
  mutate(col = col + (extract_numeric(name)-1)) %>%
  left_join(cs_val)

rs <- rs_pos %>%
  mutate(row = row + (extract_numeric(name)-1)) %>%
  left_join(rs_val)

my.df <- rbind(cs,rs)

The result is a data.frame with one row for every "minimum" of a row or column, with extra rows for ties.:

my.df
   name row col type val
1    c1   3   1    c   1
2    c2   4   2    c   1
3    c3   1   3    c   3
4    c4   1   4    c   6
5    c4   4   4    c   6
6    c5   3   5    c   1
7    r1   1   1    r   2
8    r2   2   3    r   4
9    r3   3   1    r   1
10   r3   3   5    r   1
11   r4   4   2    r   1
12   r5   5   1    r   2

Identifying "groups" of minima:

These duplicated rows are important, because when they are present we know that a row or column either a) has two minima which are equal to each other or b) a row and a column have the same minima or c) both.

We can make a little convenience function to locate these pairs of values:

findpairs <- function(var) xor(duplicated(var,incomparables = NA),
                           duplicated(var,fromLast = TRUE,incomparables = NA))

my.df.dup <- my.df %>%
  mutate(coord = paste(row,col,sep = ",")) %>%
  select(coord,name,type) %>%
  spread(type,name) %>%
  mutate(cdup = findpairs(c),
         rdup = findpairs(r)) %>%
  group_by(coord) %>%
  mutate(nval = sum(!is.na(c),!is.na(r)),
         dup = any(cdup,rdup)) %>%
  mutate(grp = ifelse(nval == 1 & !dup, 1, 0),
         grp = ifelse(nval == 1 & dup, 2, grp),
         grp = ifelse(nval == 2 & !dup, 3, grp),
         grp = ifelse(nval == 2 & dup, 4, grp)) %>%
  arrange(grp) %>%
  select(coord,c,r,grp) 

my.df.dup
  coord  c  r grp
1   1,1 NA r1   1
2   1,3 c3 NA   1
3   2,3 NA r2   1
4   5,1 NA r5   1
5   1,4 c4 NA   2
6   4,4 c4 NA   2
7   4,2 c2 r4   3
8   3,1 c1 r3   4
9   3,5 c5 r3   4

my.df.dup has one row for each position in the matrix which has a minimum value. two columns, c and r, hold the names of the columns and rows (respectively) for which the value at this position is a minima. Note that for now we are considering the relationships among minima, not their actual values.

The grp column is handy -- identifying minima which fall into four categories, based whether they are "shared" or not:

## nval = 1, dup = FALSE : unique minima
## nval = 1, dup = TRUE  : duplicated minima, unshared
## nval = 2, dup = FALSE : a row-column pair
## nval = 2, dup = TRUE  : >=2 columns share minima with a row (or vice-versa)

Only minima in grp = 4 will require "splitting" according to steps 6 through 8 above. For simplicity (and speed) I separate these from the main data, edit, then replace:

my.df.not4 <- my.df.dup %>%
  filter(grp != 4) %>%
  ungroup %>%
  filter(!(grp == 2 & duplicated(c)))

my.df.4 <- my.df.dup %>% 
  ungroup %>%
  filter(grp == 4) %>%
  group_by(c) %>%
  mutate(c_new = ifelse(sample(!duplicated(c)),c,NA)) %>%
  ungroup %>%
  group_by(r) %>%
  mutate(r_new = ifelse(sample(!duplicated(r)),r,NA)) %>%
  ungroup %>%
  select(coord, c = c_new, r = r_new)

The final call to mutate replaces any duplicated values with "NA"; this is my interpretation of steps 6-8 above. I'm not sure how this will work if minima are shared sometimes across columns, and sometimes across rows. YMMV.

the two dataframes: names and minima

Finally, we convert our answers above to two dataframes: one of minima "names" (actually the rows and columns which are removed) and one of the actual minima. The latter gives the order of removal, the former the groups which should be removed:

my.df.names <- rbind(my.df.not4,my.df.4) %>% 
  gather(type,name,c:r,na.rm = TRUE) %>%
  group_by(coord) %>%
  mutate(size = n(),
         name = ifelse(size == 2, paste(name,collapse = ","), name)) %>%
  select(coord,name) %>%
  ungroup

my.df.mins <- my.df %>%
  mutate(coord = paste(row,col,sep = ",")) %>%
  select(coord,val) %>%
  arrange(val %>% desc) %>%
  ungroup


my.df.names
   coord  name
1    1,3    c3
2    1,4    c4
3    4,2 c2,r4
4    3,1    c1
5    3,5 c5,r3
6    1,1    r1
7    2,3    r2
8    5,1    r5
9    4,2 c2,r4
10   3,5 c5,r3

my.df.mins
   coord val
1    1,4   6
2    4,4   6
3    2,3   4
4    1,3   3
5    1,1   2
6    5,1   2
7    3,1   1
8    4,2   1
9    3,5   1
10   3,1   1
11   3,5   1
12   4,2   1

The last step is straightforward: merge the two dataframes, sort by val, and return the names of the rows-or-columns which will be removed. If you want to break ties randomly, you can simply use sample() within each unique value of val:

output <- left_join(data.frame(my.df.names),my.df.mins) %>%
  unique %>%
  arrange(desc(val)) %>%
  group_by(val) %>%
  mutate(namesamp = sample(name))

output$namesamp
"c4"    "r2"    "c3"    "r1"    "r5"    "c5,r3" "c1"    "c2,r4"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yes, though this doesn't solve the tie issue, does it? For instance, it wants to do r1 and r5 together, when they should be separate (see the edit to the original question). – Henry David Thorough Jul 10 '14 at 19:47
1  
No, although that is easy to fix. the tricky part is defining your 3-way tie algorithm – AndrewMacDonald Jul 10 '14 at 19:49
    
This is great! Nailed it! – Henry David Thorough Jul 18 '14 at 21:14
    
Glad to hear that was helpful! I hope it scales well to larger matrices. at the very least it will help you get started! I'm very curious about the application here. What is the use of knowing this "removal sequence" of rows or columns? – AndrewMacDonald Jul 18 '14 at 21:47

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