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I'm trying to write a macro in C that gets a byte (char) and an index, then it reads the indexth bit from that byte. This is what I got:

#define READBIT(byte, index) (byte) & (1 << (index))

And this is how I check it:

for (i = 7; i >= 0; i--)
{
    printf("%d", READBIT('a', i));
}

It prints 0643200001.

Why isn't it working and how do I fix it?

share|improve this question
    
The first bit of 'a' is 1 so 1 will be printed 8 times – Mickey Jul 10 '14 at 18:45
    
Sorry, didn't notice, but now it's still not working. – shoham Jul 10 '14 at 18:46
    
@turbulencetoo How do I change the macro to return just 0 and 1? – shoham Jul 10 '14 at 18:49
1  
@shoham, see Paul Roub's answer below – turbulencetoo Jul 10 '14 at 18:50
1  
Dunno why Paul Roub deleted his answer... it looked pretty good to me! – abelenky Jul 10 '14 at 18:52
up vote 5 down vote accepted
#define READBIT(byte, index) (((unsigned)(byte) >> (index)) & 1)

Noting that >> and << are better defined for unsigned values.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, but why is this #define READBIT(byte, index) ((byte) & (1 << (index)) >> (index)) wrong? – shoham Jul 10 '14 at 18:50
1  
@shoham: << and >> have higher precedence than &, so you'd need #define READBIT(byte, index) ( ((byte) & 1<<(index)) >> (index) ). – mafso Jul 10 '14 at 19:06
3  
Masking down to the bit and then shifting that down will do the job, as well... though it looks like one operation more than is necessary. It's perhaps worth noting that >> is better defined for unsigned values. So READBIT(byte, index) (((unsigned int)(byte) >> (index)) & 1) is probably better. – user3793679 Jul 10 '14 at 19:08
    
I tried with my gcc and at least they don't compile to the same instructions; but I think more important than performance is the readability. And your version is more readable, I'd say. I just wanted to explain to Shoham why his way didn't work. And +1 for mentioning that bit stuff should (almost) always be done on unsigned types (maybe add this to your answer). – mafso Jul 10 '14 at 19:27

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