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I have just intalled apache on a fresh CentOS 6.5 installation. I entered the ip address in the browser address bar, and it failed to connect. I then turned off iptables, and refeshed, and this time I could connect.

So clearly iptables is blocking the http (port 80) traffic.

So I looked at the iptables rules (untouched after fresh Centos install remember):

[root@centos ~]# iptables --list
Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination         
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            state RELATED,ESTABLISHED 
ACCEPT     icmp --  anywhere             anywhere            
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            state NEW tcp dpt:ssh 
REJECT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            reject-with icmp-host-prohibited 

Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination         
REJECT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            reject-with icmp-host-prohibited 

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination  

Now, I'm not an iptables expert, but I thought I understood it well enough to troubleshoot a simple thing like this. But I am confused, because the 3rd line in the INPUT chain is this:

ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            

Which appears to be saying "for any protocol, from any source, to any destination, accept"

So I would expect that I could connect to the website (tcp, port 80). But I can't. So I must have misunderstood something about how iptables works, or the meaning of the listing.

Can anyone explain why the above rules do not allow incoming http connections?

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1 Answer 1

I figured it out myself. No wonder I was confused - the listing doesn't show the full story. I tried it again using the -v (verbose) option.

[root@centos ~]# iptables -L -v
Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT 0 packets, 0 bytes)
 pkts bytes target     prot opt in     out     source               destination         
81194  118M ACCEPT     all  --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            state RELATED,ESTABLISHED 
    0     0 ACCEPT     icmp --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            
    0     0 ACCEPT     all  --  lo     any     anywhere             anywhere            
    7   364 ACCEPT     tcp  --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            state NEW tcp dpt:ssh 
   21  2394 REJECT     all  --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            reject-with icmp-host-prohibited 

In particular, it now shows the INTERFACE as well. The 3rd rule, which I thought was extremely permissive, is not actually permissive at all because it only applies to the system's internal loopback address.

So an HTTP request from outside will be received on an ethernet interface, not the loopback, the 3rd rules doesn't apply, and so the only one matching is the final REJECT rule.

Hopefully this will help someone not be as confused as I was.

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