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I recently came across a piece of code that used

array.sort{|x,y| y <=> x}

to sort an array of integers in descending order. I looked up the <=> operator and understand that it returns three different values, -1, 0, or 1, depending on whether or not one value is less than, greater to, or equal to the other other value.

But I cannot reason out why this would make the above code sort the array in descending order, but know that it definitely does thanks to IRB. What's going on here? Can somebody explain this to me?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the same reasons that this:

array.sort{|x,y| x <=> y}

Sorts by ascending order.


Take this program for example:

[1,5,2,4,3].sort do |x,y|
  puts "---"
  puts x
  puts y
  puts x <=> y
  x <=> y
end

It'll output the two numbers that it's comparing, and then the result of the <=> during the sort. It outputs this:

---
1
2
-1 # 1 is less than 2
---
2
3
-1 # 2 is less than 3
---
5
2
1 # 5 is greater than 1
---
4
2
1 # 4 is greater than 2
---
5
4
1 # 5 is greater than 4
---
4
3
1 # 4 is greater than 3

If you reverse the order of x <=> y to be y <=> x, you're going to get the opposite result.

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Thanks. I understood that it would sort it in ascending order if the x and y were reversed. I just didn't understand where the <=> came in. So it basically iterates over each value in the array and then maps it into a new array, like... shuffling a deck of cards, with the unordered cards behind your finger, and with each card you draw from the unordered pile, checking to see whether it should go in front of or behind the card you're looking at in the sorted pile? –  wendybeth Jul 11 '14 at 2:20
    
That's not what it does - that sorting algorithm sounds like insertion sort and is slower than the quick sort algorithm used by ruby –  Frederick Cheung Jul 11 '14 at 7:55

Because you did y <=> x, not x <=> y. Order of arguments is important.

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I've chosen to give an answer that I hope will be understandable to most Ruby newbies.

Array#sort compares each pair of elements in the array. For each pair of elements x,y, sort's block returns -1 if x precedes y in the sort, 1 if y precedes x and 0 if either can precede the other. If no block is given, sort employs the block:

{ |x,y| x <=> y }

If, for example, x and y are strings, the method String#<=> might be defined like this:

class String
  def <=>(other)
    case
    when self < other then -1
    when self > other then  1
    else 0
    end
  end
end

Similarly, Array#<=> is invoked if x and y are arrays, and so on. For Fixnums, Bignums and Floats (all of which are from classes that descend from Numeric), the method Numeric#<=> is used, so that the array being sorted can contain a mix of those three data types.

If sort's block is:

{ |x,y| y <=> x }

the block returns the values shown here (with the values for the default x <=> y shown for comparison):

enter image description here

Now suppose we wish to sort the array [2,3,1,2]. For the default sort, the sort block with x <=> y returns the values shown here:

enter image description here

which causes sort to return [1,2,2,3]. If the sort block is

{ |x,y| y <=> x }

the sort block returns these values:

enter image description here

causing sort to return [3,2,2,1].

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This is also very clear and helpful. Thank you. –  wendybeth Jul 11 '14 at 15:14

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