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In R user-defined operators are allowed, but it seems that only % % like operators are accepted. Is it possible to walk around this restriction to define operators like, for example, >>, or something that is not like % %?

The operator must be a real operator so that we can use it like 1 >> 2 and do not have to use it like ">>"(1,2).

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1  
Even if you did use >> as an operator, you can only access it with using quotes or backticks. And even then, rarely in a convenient manner. Example: `>>` <- `+`; ">>"(4, 2) – A Handcart And Mohair Jul 11 '14 at 12:07
    
Yes: see sos::??? or cgwtools::splatnd for examples. But do take heed of all the warnings provided in the answers and comments. – Carl Witthoft Jul 11 '14 at 13:06

No. R only allows you to

  1. redefine existing operators (such as + or, indeed <-),
  2. define new infix operators by surrounding them with %…%.

These are the rules we have to play by. However, inside these rules all is fair and games. For instance, we can redefine + for character strings to perform concatenation, without destroying its normal meaning (addition):

> `+`
function (e1, e2)  .Primitive("+")

This is the old definition, which we want to preserve for numbers:

> `+.default` = .Primitive('+')
> `+.character` = paste0
> `+` = function (e1, e2) UseMethod('+')
> 1 + 2
[1] 3
> 'hello' + 'world'
[1] "helloworld"

This exploits the S3 class system in R to make + generic on the type of its first argument.

The list of operators that can thus be redefined is quite eclectic. At first count, it contains the following operators:

+, -, *, /, ^, **, &, |, :, ::, :::, $, $<-, =, <-, <<-, ==, <, <=, >, >=, !=, ~, &&, ||, !, ?, ??, @, @<-

(Taken from the modules source code.)

In addition, you can override -> by redefining <-. This seems like it would rarely make sense – but at least one good example of this exists, to define less verbose lambdas:

> sapply(1 : 4, x -> 2 * x)
[1] 2 4 6 8

Implementation as a gist

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You can do things like this, but you may want to assign these objects to a new environment to be safe.

> "^" <- function(x, y) `-`(x, y)  ## subtract y from x
> 5 ^ 3
# [1] 2

> "?" <- function(x, y) sum(x, y)  ## add x and y
> 5 ? 5
# [1] 10
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4  
These only work because you are reassigning an exiting operator (ie ^ is for using exponentiation and ? is normally for help). If you try to use a different set of symbols like << the parser won't understand and will throw an error. It's probably not a good idea to reassign incase other functions rely on their standard definitions. – MrFlick Jul 11 '14 at 13:00
1  
@MrFlick While this is an important caveat, see my answer for a way to carefully override operators, which works around this restriction. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 11 '14 at 13:04
1  
You could also assign it to a different environment, right? Its own environment. – Richard Scriven Jul 11 '14 at 13:05

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