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I notice surprised behaviour:

I can write so:

Integer integer = 0;
integer++;

But I cannot write so:

getInteger()++;

if

public static Integer getInteger(){
        return 0;
    }

For me two snippets looks like same.

But second snippets produces:

unexpected type
        getInteger()++;
                  ^
  required: variable
  found:    value

Why second constructions is forbid?

Often in code I forced to write ugly constructions like this:

obj.set(obj.get()+1);

It looks redundantly.

share|improve this question
    
you can not perform constant++ i.e. 5++. In your method you are return 0 ; –  Rahul Jul 11 at 12:24
    
How different is obj.get()+1 from obj.get()++ ? –  Kartik_Koro Jul 11 at 12:25
    
What would you expect it to do? Translate into a call to setInteger(getInteger() + 1)? Don't forget that the Java language doesn't know anything about getters and setters... –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 at 12:27

5 Answers 5

x++ is not the same as x + 1. It's short for x += 1, i.e. x = x + 1; increment, then assign. So getInteger()++ means getInteger() = getInteger() + 1, which makes no sense. You're adding one to a value, not incrementing a variable.

Apart from that, ++ works on int but not Integer, but even if you were returning an int you couldn't increment it with ++:

class Test {
    static public void main() {
        getint()++;
    }
    static int getint() {
        int a = 0;
        return a;
    }
}

gives

Test.java:3: error: unexpected type
        getint()++;
              ^
  required: variable
  found:    value

(In C++ you could make this work with references, but Java doesn't have those.)

share|improve this answer
1  
@Alnitak Integer doesn't, but Java 5.0+ supports it with boxing. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 11 at 12:28
1  
@PeterLawrey fair point about boxing - presumably the compiler is unable to box in the getInteger()++ scenario –  Alnitak Jul 11 at 12:29
    
@Alnitak It doesn't work with int, see example. –  larsmans Jul 11 at 12:32
1  
ETOOMANYLANGUAGESINMYHEAD –  Alnitak Jul 11 at 12:33
2  
@Zhuinden that was my initial argument, but as Peter pointed out, with auto-boxing it's possible to use it. The real problem is simply that the result of the function is a value instead of an lvalue –  Alnitak Jul 11 at 12:37

8++ will not make sense,while

int x=8;
x++;

do make sense because x++, is working like x+=1, i.e x=x+1 and 8=8+1 is something not acceptable.

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As it says, it requires a variable for ++ operator. ++ increments a value that is stored somewhere, so the incremented value is now stored in that location. your function just returns a value , which is not a variable.

It's as simple as Rahul mentioned in the comment.

//This works
x=5;
x++; //Now x=6 since x++ is equivalent to x=x+1;

//This doesn't work
5++; //this doesn't even make sense, trying to do 5=5+1??

//similarly, getNumber() is just a value that is returned, it is a value, not a variable
//So it is like the second case
//This doesn't work
getNumber()++; //Trying to do getNumber()=getNumber()+1; ??
share|improve this answer

Why second constructions is forbid?

Integer is immutable, so you couldn't change it anyway. int is mutable but since it only returns a copy on the value, this won't work either.

e.g.

public static Integer getInteger(){
    return 0;
}

// what would this do
getInteger()++;

// now the method has been changed to 
public static Integer getInteger(){
    return 0+1;
}
// so now
System.out.println(getInteger()); // prints 1 ??

obj.set(obj.get()+1);

This breaks encapsulation as well. I would suggest a method like this

AtomicInteger i = new AtomicInteger(0);
i.incrementAndGet();

or you could have your own

i.incr();
share|improve this answer

You are not returning an int, you're returning an Integer object. The Integer class is immutable and has no ++ operator of its own.

Also, the ++ operator requires that its operand be an lvalue, i.e. an assignable variable as opposed to a value. The result of getInteger() is the latter.

In the case of your first test:

Integer integer = 0; integer++;

Java's autoboxing allows the use of the ++ operator, but only because Java automatically converts the Integer into an int and then back again, and because the variable integer is an lvalue. It's more or less equivalent to:

int tmp_int = integer.intValue();
int result = tmp_int++;
integer = Integer.getInteger(tmp_int);
(void)result;                      

result - the effective "value" of the expression isn't integer because you've used the "post increment" version of ++, so the result is the value that integer had before it was incremented.

share|improve this answer
    
Integer integer = 0; integer++; this code works –  gstackoverflow Jul 11 at 13:41
    
@gstackoverflow yes, see update –  Alnitak Jul 11 at 13:48

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