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We're struggling with a policy to correctly handle exceptions in our application. Here's our goals for it (summarized):

  • Handle only specific exceptions.
  • Handle only exceptions that you can correct
  • Log only once.

We've come out with a solution that involves a generic Application Specific Exception and works like this in a piece of code:

try {
  // Do whatever
}
catch(ArgumentNullException ane)
{
  // Handle, optinally log and continue
}
catch(AppSpecificException)
{
  // Rethrow, don't log, don't do anything else
  throw;
}
catch(Exception e)
{
  // Log, encapsulate (so that it won't be logged again) and throw
  Logger.Log("Really bad thing", e.Message, e);
  throw new AppSpecificException(e)
}

All exception is logged and then turned to an AppSpecificException so that it won't be logged again. Eventually it will reach the last resort event handler that will deal with it if it has to.

I don't have so much experience with exception handling patterns... Is this a good way to solve our goals? Has it any major drawbacks or big red warnings?

Note: One of the drawbacks of this is that after the first catch you lose the ability to handle an specific exception (if you call a method that calls another method and the second one throws an exception you're not able to handle it) but I've found I've never done this any way ... I only handle exceptions with one level of depth ...

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8 Answers 8

up vote 52 down vote accepted

If you log the exception too near the time it is first thrown, you won't be logging the full stack trace.

Handle exceptions (that is, fix them), as close as possible to when they were thrown. Gather information about the context as soon as possible to when they were thrown. But allow exceptions to propagate up to where they can actually be handled. Logging is a last-resort sort of handling, so it should occur in the outer layers of application subsystems.

This should eliminate the need for an application-specific exception used as a marker to not log an exception which shouldn't have been caught to begin with.

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3  
I thought the stack trace is embed in the exception object... –  Jorge Córdoba Mar 18 '10 at 12:52
1  
@Jorge: the stack trace is added to as the exception traverses stack levels. It's the stack trace "to date". –  John Saunders Mar 18 '10 at 12:56
4  
+1 This is the best advice - I wish I could upvote this twice! –  Andrew Hare Mar 18 '10 at 13:23
1  
+1 If you use the pattern proposed in the question, I strongly suspect you'll regret it. Just speaking practically, it requires massive amounts of unnecessary code, compared to logging in the application layer. –  Jeff Sternal Mar 18 '10 at 13:41
    
If the logging mechanism supports it, I would think it may be helpful to have the logging mechanism note when the exception occurs, but have the log entry be "superceded" as the exception goes up the call chain. Otherwise if an exception occurs while unwinding the stack from an as-yet-unlogged earlier exception, there will be no way to log anything about that earlier exception. –  supercat Feb 19 at 18:39

See the comments to this blog post:

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2010/03/04/too-much-reuse.aspx

There is some excellent discussion in there of some of the pitfalls of handling exceptions.

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Currently, there are 5 pages of comments. @Eric, could you summarize the most salient pitfalls? –  Jay Walker May 28 '13 at 23:09
    
@JayWalker: I don't have time. But feel free to do so yourself. –  Eric Lippert May 28 '13 at 23:18

Don't log an exception and then re-throw it - it is the callers responsibility to handle / log any exceptions that you generate.

Only catch an exception to handle it (for example to log it), or add context specific information.

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This is a quite common approach to solve the exception handling problem (from more specific to less specific).

Just bear in mind that having one generic ApplicationSpecific exception to catch everything that happens in that application/method is not a great idea if you want to catch specific problems. Eventually try extending it with more specific exceptions.

Rethrowing exceptions is good, better is declaring the method to throw certain exceptions and let callers handle them. This way you'll have to create less code and you could centralize some controls.

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-1: you can't actually "declare" which exceptions a method throws –  John Saunders Feb 19 at 10:06

A good solution about exception handling is using Interception. However you must validate if this pattern can be applied to your application depending on the architecture : Interception requires a container.

The principle is to factorise your exception handling outside the methods by using attributes (custom) on them and then use the container to initialize your instances. The container will proxy theses instances by reflection : its called instances interceptors. You'll just have to call your methods as usual via theses instances and let interception mechanism do the job you coded before or after the method.

Note that you can add try catch in the methods to manage specific exception that are unmanaged in your interceptors.

Unity interception : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd140045.aspx

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First option to solve the stack trace problem:

class AppSpecificException : ApplicationException
{
    public string SpecificTrace { get; private set; }
    public string SpecificMessage { get; private set; }

    public AppSpecificException(string message, Exception innerException)
    {
        SpecificMessage = message;
        SpecificTrace = innerException.StackTrace;
    }

}

I had to write an example to understand the question and check the stacktrace problem, this is the code to me, put attention to the button2_click method, finally my textbox show the crash string and the stacktrace:

    private String internalValue;

    private void Operation1(String pField)
    {
        if (pField == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("pField");
        internalValue = pField;
    }

    private void Operation2(Object pField)
    {
        if (pField == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("pField");
        internalValue = Convert.ToInt32(pField).ToString();
    }

    private void Operation3(String pField)
    {
        if (pField == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("pField");
        internalValue = pField;
        Operation2(-1);
    }


    /// <exception cref="AppSpecificException"><c>AppSpecificException</c>.</exception>
    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            Operation1("One");
            Operation2("Two");
            Operation3("Three");
            MessageBox.Show(internalValue);
        }
        catch (ArgumentNullException ex)
        {
            textBoxException.Text = ex.Message + (char) 13 + (char) 10 + ex.StackTrace;
        }
        catch (AppSpecificException ex)
        {
            //textBoxException.Text = ex.Message + (char)13 + (char)10 + ex.StackTrace;
            throw;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            textBoxException.Text = ex.Message + (char)13 + (char)10 + ex.StackTrace;                    
            throw new AppSpecificException("crash", ex);
        }

    }

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            button1_Click(sender, e);
        }
        catch (AppSpecificException ex)
        {
            textBoxException.Text = ex.SpecificMessage + (char) 13 + (char) 10 + ex.SpecificTrace;
        }
    }
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-1 for many reasons: inheriting from ApplicationException, use of (char)13+(char)10 (what if that's not the platform-specific newline?) Using ex.StackTrace instead of ex.ToString(), catching ArgumentNullException but not ArgumentException, etc. Wish I had seen this years ago. –  John Saunders Feb 25 '13 at 5:49

Try to avoid creating a new exception and and rethrowing, since throwing an exception sets the stack trace to where the exception was thrown. Just do a plain throw. See Too Much Reuse on Eric Lippert's Blog.

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I'd recommend putting more thought into what patterns you want to use for "handing"

If your handling patterns come down to log or rethrow, then the rethrown error will eventually be logged. So in the end, it's just error logging. If you're using ASP.NET use elmah so at least your code isn't covered with try/catch-and-log boiler plate.

There are only a few ways to "handle" errors that don't end in mere logging.

Re-try. (Watch out for infinite loops)

Wait and re-try.

Try different but equivalent technique (Can't connect on http? try connecting on https).

Establish the missing conditions (create the folder that threw the FolderNotFoundException)

Ignore the error-- think twice about this, it makes sense only when the error isn't really a problem, like if a 3rd party library is warning you about a condition that doesn't apply.

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The above list ignores what in many circumstances would be the most useful way to handle an exception: simply deal with the fact that a requested operation didn't happen, without particular regard for why. If a user asks to open a document, and the attempt at loading it fails, inform the user that the document couldn't be opened. Details as to why it couldn't be opened may be helpful, but aren't nearly as important as the fact that the request failed. Unfortunately, there's no standard convention to distinguish "Attempted operation failed without side effects" from... –  supercat Feb 19 at 18:45
    
..."certain shared objects have become corrupted, so code should shut down as gracefully as it can without using them". Thus, code which encounters an exception whose exact particulars weren't anticipated will often have no choice but to guess whether it should proceed without having been able to do something whose failure it was prepared to cope with, whether it should assume the CPU is on fire and do an abrupt shutdown, or whether it should do something in-between. –  supercat Feb 19 at 18:48
    
Then post an answer or down vote me (and the other people who have posted similar answers), why are you distracting me 4 years on? –  MatthewMartin Feb 19 at 21:27

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