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I have the following simple problem: A class template<typename D> Parser which defines a ModuleType as Module<Parser>. I would like to inject the parser type into the module, as to be able to extract again several types from the parser in it. This is handy as one needs only one template parameter in Module. But the problem comes if the parser needs some types which are defined in the module such as OptionsType, accessing this in the Parser by the using declaration using ModuleOptions = ... obviously does not work for an istantiation of the derived class ParserDerived. Error: error: no type named ‘DType’ in ‘struct ParserDerived<double>’ using DType = typename Parser::DType; So somehow the types

I am afraid of using such patterns and because I might be realising in the future that all my construction with these patterns collapse into tons of hard to understand compiler failures...

What would be a better approach for the problem below?

CODE

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

using namespace std;

template<typename Parser>
struct Module{
    using DType = typename Parser::DType;
    using OptionsType = int;
};

template<typename D, typename Derived = void >
struct Parser{
    using DType = D;

    using DerivedType = typename std::conditional< std::is_same<Derived,void>::value, Parser, Derived>::type;
    using ModuleType = Module<DerivedType>;
    //using ModuleOptions = typename ModuleType::OptionsType; //uncomment this!!
};

template<typename D>
struct ParserDerived: Parser<D, ParserDerived<D> >{
    using Base = Parser<D, ParserDerived<D> >;

    using ModuleType = typename Base::ModuleType;
    using DType = typename Base::DType;
};


int main() {
    Parser<double> t;

    ParserDerived<double> d;
}
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3  
Could you move the typedefs inside Parser independent of ModuleTypeA into a nested type and pass that to ModuleA? –  dyp Jul 11 '14 at 13:15
1  
I don't get it. Your code is supposed to cause a compiler error if uncommenting the line marked as "uncomment this!!", right? But it doesn't. GCC, clang, Intel all agree that the code is fine. –  hvd Jul 11 '14 at 13:24
    
Now I am confused as well, before there was an error, damm , try to reproduce the error –  Gabriel Jul 11 '14 at 13:29
2  
For a discussion whether or not this is allowed, see stackoverflow.com/q/17478621 –  dyp Jul 11 '14 at 13:34
    
actually the code, works but, the comment of hvd is quite good! I think my problem lies somewhere else –  Gabriel Jul 11 '14 at 13:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's what happens:

  • d gets defined as ParserDerived<double>, so that is instantiated
    • The base class is given as Parser<double, ParserDerived<double>>, so that is instantiated
      • DType gets defined as double
      • DerivedType gets defined as ParserDerived<double>
      • ModuleType gets defined as Module<ParserDerived<double>>
      • ModuleOptions gets defined as Module<ParserDerived<double>>::OptionsType, so Module<ParserDerived<double>> is instantiated
        • DType gets defined as ParserDerived<double>::DTypeERROR HERE
        • OptionsType gets defined as int
    • Base gets defined as Parser<double, ParserDerived<double>>
    • ModuleType gets defined as Parser<double, ParserDerived<double>>::ModuleType
    • DType gets defined as Parser<double, ParserDerived<double>>::DType

If you draw out the instantiations like that, it becomes clear that DType is used before it is defined. It's not immediately obvious that the template instantiation has to be performed sequentially like this, but dyp's comment on your question already answers that it's a valid means of template instantiation, and you can see that it's what multiple compilers do.

You will have to re-work your design. In this particular case, I think a very workable approach would be to mimic the standard library (a bit) and provide a parser traits class. You would move the definitions of ModuleType and DType there, so that accessing those definitions would not require instantiation of the parser class.

In response to your comment:

It shouldn't matter whether you comment the derived class's DType since that cannot seen regardless of whether it's defined, but it's a good question why the base class's DType doesn't get used in its place. Parser<double, ParserDerived<double>> is getting instantiated in order to use it as a base class, but during that instantiation it isn't seen as the base class yet. After the instantiation has been performed, the compiler would first make sure that Parser<double, ParserDerived<double>> is suitable as a base class, and only then would it become the base class.

For a shorter example that more clearly shows this:

template <class B> struct A {
  static void f(A &);
  static decltype(f(*(B*)0)) g();
};
struct B : A<B> { };

Since B derives from A<B>, A<B>::f(A<B> &) should be callable when passed an lvalue of type B. That does not, however, prevent the compiler from complaining about the declaration of g, and clang's error message quite explicitly calls A<B> and B unrelated types:

error: non-const lvalue reference to type 'A<B>' cannot bind to a value of unrelated type 'B'

Here too this happens because B only becomes known as deriving from A<B> after the instantiation of A<B> has completed.

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thanks for the clarification!! hmmm. actually we can uncomment the using DType in ParserDerived class and the error stays the same. does that make sense¿ i thought it should see the typedef DType in the base class but this is not what happens instead... –  Gabriel Jul 12 '14 at 15:28
    
@Gabriel Good question, I've expanded on that in my answer. –  hvd Jul 12 '14 at 16:01
1  
@Gabriel Almost: template <typename Parser> struct ParserTraits /* intentionally undefined */ ; -- and then have each parser class provide a specialisation (and make sure that specialisation does not require the parser class to be completed yet). –  hvd Jul 13 '14 at 21:18
1  
@Gabriel Note that in hindsight, a slightly easier-to-use alternative would be to provide that traits class as a template argument, instead of (or perhaps even in addition to) the derived class. –  hvd Jul 13 '14 at 21:21
1  
@Gabriel I don't see anything wrong with it. Depending on your specific needs, it could even be more generalised than you need (as could my approach -- you'll be a better judge of that -- and in that case, it could be simplified), but it should do what you want, and it should do so reliably, as far as I can tell. –  hvd Jul 14 '14 at 11:54

I came up with a simple and effective solution to circumvent the above typedef problems: This is little more complex example, which uses a ParserTraits struct which defines all types which are needed in Parser and Modules ModuleA,ModuleB. It is now also possible to use the defined ModuleB ind the ModuleA class and also the Parser can access all Module#Options typedefs...

The code is here: https://ideone.com/nVWfp6

template<typename ParserTraits>
struct ModuleA {


    using ParserType = typename ParserTraits::ParserType;
    using DType = typename ParserTraits::DType;
    using OptionsType = int;

    using ModuleBType = typename ParserTraits::ModuleBType;
    using ModuleBOptions = typename ModuleBType::OptionsType;

    void foo(){
        std::cout << "ModuleA::foo: ParserType: " << typeid(ParserType).name() << std::endl;
        std::cout << "ModuleA::foo: ModuleBType: " << typeid(ModuleBType).name() << std::endl;
        std::cout << "ModuleA::foo: ModuleBOptions: " << typeid(ModuleBOptions).name() << std::endl;
    }
};

template<typename ParserTraits>
struct ModuleB {
    using ParserType = typename ParserTraits::ParserType;
    using DType = typename ParserTraits::DType;
    using OptionsType = float;

    using ModuleAType = typename ParserTraits::ModuleAType;
    using ModuleAOptions = typename ModuleAType::OptionsType; //uncomment this!!

    void foo(){
        std::cout << "ModuleB::foo: ParserType: " << typeid(ParserType).name() << std::endl;
        std::cout << "ModuleB::foo: ModuleAType: " << typeid(ModuleAType).name() << std::endl;
        std::cout << "ModuleB::foo: ModuleAOptions: " << typeid(ModuleAOptions).name() << std::endl;
    }
};

// The PARSER TYPE TRAITS Struct!!
template<typename Parser,typename D>
struct ParserTraits {
    using DType = D;
    using ParserType = Parser;

    using ModuleAType = ModuleA<ParserTraits>;
    using ModuleBType = ModuleB<ParserTraits>;
};

template<typename D, typename Derived = void >
struct Parser {

    using DType = D;

    // Inject the derived class as the parser class for the modules
    using DerivedType = typename std::conditional< std::is_same<Derived,void>::value, Parser, Derived>::type;
    using ParserTraitsType = ParserTraits<DerivedType,DType>;

    using ModuleAType = ModuleA<ParserTraitsType>;
    using ModuleBType = ModuleB<ParserTraitsType>;

    using ModuleAOptions = typename ModuleAType::OptionsType; //uncomment this!!
    using ModuleBOptions = typename ModuleBType::OptionsType; //uncomment this!!

    virtual void foo(){
        std::cout << "Parser::foo" << std::endl;
        ModuleAType a;
        a.foo();
        ModuleBType b;
        b.foo();
    }
};

template<typename D>
struct ParserGUI: Parser<D, ParserGUI<D> > {

    using Base = Parser<D, ParserGUI<D> >;

    void foo(){
        std::cout << "ParserGUI::foo" << std::endl;
        typename Base::ModuleAType a;
        a.foo();
        typename Base::ModuleBType b;
        b.foo();
    }

};

int test() {
    std::cout << "SceneParser1" << std::endl;
    Parser<double> t;
    t.foo();

    ParserGUI<double> d;
    d.foo();

    ParserGUI<double> r;
    ParserGUI<double>::Base & base =  r;
    base.foo();
}
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