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Please take a look at this Fiddle Example

I want to convert each field into a row from this table:

CREATE TABLE product
    (`ID` int, `name` varchar(1), `category` varchar(11), `price` int,`year`int)
;

INSERT INTO product
    (`ID`, `name`, `category`, `price`,`year`)
VALUES
    (1, 'A', 'Outdoor', 25,2010),
    (2, 'A', 'Doll', 34,2009),
    (3, 'C', 'Doll', 25,2008),
    (4, 'D', 'Outdoor', 20,2010),
    (5, 'E', 'Brainteaser', 22,2010),
    (6, 'E', 'Brainteaser', 22,2009),
    (7, 'G', 'Brainteaser', 30,2009),
    (8, 'G', 'Brainteaser', 30,2009)
;

Here's the output I'm trying to get:

field           value
name            A,C,D,E,G
category        Brainteaser,Doll,Outdoor
price           20,22,25,30,34
year            2008,2009,2010

I read a thread about pivoting table with UNION and MAX but I was lost at using MAX with GROUP_CONCAT

   SELECT 
    MAX(CASE WHEN ... GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT (value) SEPARATOR '|')) as value
    from(
    select id,name value, 'name' field
    from product
    union all
    select id,category value, 'category' field 
    from product
    union all
    select id,price value, 'price' field
    from product
    union all
    select id,year value, 'year' field
    from product
      )
    GROUP BY field
    order by value

Can anyone show me how to get that output?

share|improve this question
    
In what context are you evaluating a MAX on the 'value', which you are calling a field? – user3741598 Jul 11 '14 at 14:38
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This will give you expected output:

SELECT 'name' AS `field`. GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `name`  ORDER BY `name`) AS `value`
FROM product
UNION ALL
SELECT 'category' AS `field`. GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `category` ORDER BY `category`) AS `value`
FROM product
UNION ALL
SELECT 'price' AS `field`. GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `price` ORDER BY `price`) AS `value`
FROM product
UNION ALL
SELECT 'year' AS `field`. GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `year` ORDER BY `year`) AS `value`
FROM product

Added ORDER BY because looks like you need sorted output

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, though it feels like there must be a way to query the table only once. Nitpicking: Use union all for better performance. and drop the trailing union – winkbrace Jul 11 '14 at 14:35
1  
You got it - but left out his request for SEPARATOR '|' which goes after your ORDER BY in your GROUP_CONCAT. – user3741598 Jul 11 '14 at 14:46
    
@user3741598 well, he is talking about | in subject, but missing it in expected output, that's what confused me – Uriil Jul 11 '14 at 14:52

something like this?? Using union all for better proformance and incase there are any dupilcates.

SELECT 'name' field, group_concat(DISTINCT name ORDER BY name SEPARATOR '|') value FROM product
UNION ALL
SELECT 'category' field, group_concat(DISTINCT category ORDER BY category SEPARATOR '|') value FROM product
UNION ALL
SELECT 'price' field, group_concat(DISTINCT price ORDER BY price SEPARATOR '|') value FROM product
UNION ALL
SELECT 'year' field, group_concat(DISTINCT year ORDER BY year SEPARATOR '|') value FROM product;

EDIT: If you would like to do this with just one query you can achieve it this way.

SELECT
    @uName := group_concat(DISTINCT name ORDER BY name SEPARATOR '|'),
    @uCat := group_concat(DISTINCT category ORDER BY category SEPARATOR '|') uCat,
    @uPrice := group_concat(DISTINCT price ORDER BY price SEPARATOR '|') uPrice,
    @uYear := group_concat(DISTINCT year ORDER BY year SEPARATOR '|') uYear
FROM product;

SELECT 'name' field, @uName value
UNION ALL
SELECT 'category' field, @uCat value
UNION ALL
SELECT 'price' field, @uPrice value
UNION ALL
SELECT 'year' field, @uYear value;

NOTE: you can do ORDER BY inside the GROUP_CONCAT

share|improve this answer
    
@winkbrace if you would like to see a way to do it in one query see my edit :) – John Ruddell Jul 11 '14 at 14:54

There is a way to complete your request without having to query your table with many queries. In fact, method below is a way to turn any table to pivot. It will use mysql prepared statements for prepare SQL and later execute it:

SELECT 
  GROUP_CONCAT(f SEPARATOR ' UNION ALL ') 
FROM 
  (SELECT 
    CONCAT(
      'SELECT "', 
      column_name,
      '" AS `field`, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT ', 
      column_name,
      ') AS `value` FROM `', 
      @table_name, 
      '`'
    ) AS f 
    FROM 
      ((SELECT 
          column_name 
        FROM 
          INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
        WHERE 
          table_name=@table_name && 
          table_schema=@schema_name
        ) AS fields 
        CROSS JOIN 
        (SELECT 
          @table_name := 'product', 
          @schema_name:= 'test'
        ) AS init)
      ) AS sqldata

The sql above will result in a string, which can be used to assign a variable, like

mysql> SET @sql:=(SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(f SEPARATOR ' UNION ALL ') FROM (SELECT CONCAT('SELECT "', column_name,'" AS `field`, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT ', column_name,') AS `value` FROM `', @table_name, '`') AS f FROM ((SELECT column_name FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE table_name=@table_name && table_schema=@schema_name) AS fields CROSS JOIN (SELECT @table_name:='product', @schema_name:='test') AS init)) AS sqldata);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.03 sec)

next, prepare:

mysql> PREPARE stmt FROM @sql;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Statement prepared

finally, execute it:

mysql> EXECUTE stmt;
+----------+--------------------------+
| field    | value                    |
+----------+--------------------------+
| ID       | 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8          |
| name     | A,C,D,E,G                |
| category | Outdoor,Doll,Brainteaser |
| price    | 25,34,20,22,30           |
| year     | 2010,2009,2008           |
+----------+--------------------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

The benefit is that you are independent from table structure, field names, e tc. It's a general way - so you may use it to create such pivots for any table.

Few words about variables @table_name and @schema_name. They specify which table and in which schema would be pivoted. In sample above, I used CROSS JOIN to set them in-place, but you may set them separately, to maintain different tables for pivots.

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