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Let's say I have the following database in SQL Server:

CREATE TABLE [Order]
(
  ID BIGINT IDENTITY(1,1)
  CONSTRAINT PK_Order PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (ID)
);

CREATE TABLE OrderItem
(
  ID BIGINT IDENTITY(1,1),
  ORDER_ID BIGINT NOT NULL,
  PRICE_ID BIGINT NOT NULL,
  DISCOUNTED_PRICE_ID BIGINT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT PK_OrderItem PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (ID)
);

CREATE TABLE Price
(
  ID BIGINT IDENTITY(1,1),
  AMOUNT FLOAT NOT NULL,
  CURRENCY VARCHAR(3) NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT PK_Price PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (ID)
);

ALTER TABLE OrderItem ADD CONSTRAINT FK_OrderItem_Order
FOREIGN KEY (ORDER_ID) REFERENCES [Order](ID) ON DELETE CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE OrderItem ADD CONSTRAINT FK_OrderItem_Price
FOREIGN KEY (PRICE_ID) REFERENCES Price(ID);

ALTER TABLE OrderItem ADD CONSTRAINT FK_OrderItem_DiscountedPrice
FOREIGN KEY (DISCOUNTED_PRICE_ID) REFERENCES Price(ID);

If I delete an order, all order items will be deleted (because of ON DELETE CASCADE on FK_OrderItem_Order constraint), but corresponding prices (normal and discounted) will remain in the database forever.

Is there any option in SQL Server (or generic SQL) to delete corresponding prices from Price table?

I can think of a trigger which is a perfect match, but it is too much hassle for such simple (and common) task. I would prefer to specify something on my constraints (FK_OrderItem_Price and FK_OrderItem_DiscountedPrice) that basically say "this is one-to-one relationship", delete parent (Price is a parent table in this case) if a child was deleted.

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2 Answers 2

Add the OrderItemID to Price and set up a cascade delete relationship. This column is of course redundant but it allows you to have a cascade delete in the right direction.

Consider inlining the Price table two times into OrderItems. As this is a 1:1 relationship you can do that. It is a matter of taste whether you like this solution or not.

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I've got only to columns in my example - inlining might be fine. But what if I have 10 columns? –  AndreyR Jul 11 at 15:39
    
Adding additional column is an interesting option but it will increase since a) Price is going to be most populated table b) an index will probably be required on this column to make deletions fast –  AndreyR Jul 11 at 15:43
    
@AndreyR correct. These are the only automatic deletion options I know of. If you don't like those I believe there is no other answer than a trigger of app change. Or, garbage-collect unused price rows nightly. –  usr Jul 11 at 15:54

In a nutshell: no. Cascading works only from parent to child1, not the other way around.

It could be argued that some parents should be removed when they lose the last of their children, but that's simply not how current DBMSes are implemented. You'll have to use a trigger2 for such "special" referential action.

That being said, this model is a little strange. Shouldn't price be associated with product3?


1 In you case, Order and Price both act as parents to OrderItem.

2 Or a batch job it it doesn't have to happen immediately. Or hide the operations behind some sort of API (stored procedure, middle-tier method) that does that explicitly.

3 Concerns about order stability notwithstanding.

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