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Just wondering if there is a way in Spring to have a parent controller:

<bean id="parentController" class="org.springframework.web.portlet.mvc.SimpleFormController" abstract="true">
     <property name="validator" ref="validatorImpl"/>  
     ...
</bean>

, and a class extending it:

<bean id="child1Controller" class="com.portlet.controller.Child1Controller" parent="parentController">
   <property name="validator"><null/></property>
     ...
</bean>

<bean id="child2Controller" class="com.portlet.controller.Child2Controller" parent="parentController"> 
     ...
</bean>

, in such a way that the child overrides a property to null.

I know if you don't declare the property in either the parent or the child, you get the wanted effect, but as in most of the places validator refers to validatorImpl, I thought as a inheritance principle, I would be able to override a property to null.

I keep getting:

15:29:50,141 ERROR [PortletHotDeployListener:534] org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanCreationException: Error creating bean with name 'childController' defined in PortletContext resource [/WEB-INF/context/sugerencia-context.xml]: Initialization of bean failed; nested exception is java.lang.NullPointerException org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanCreationException: Error creating bean with name 'childController' defined in PortletContext resource [/WEB-INF/context/sugerencia-context.xml]: Initialization of bean failed; nested exception is java.lang.NullPointerException

On the other hand,

 <bean id="parentController" class="org.springframework.web.portlet.mvc.SimpleFormController" abstract="true">
  ...
</bean>

 <bean id="child1Controller" class="com.portlet.controller.Child1Controller" parent="parentController">
     ...
</bean>

 <bean id="child2Controller" class="com.portlet.controller.Child2Controller" parent="parentController">
    <property name="validator" ref="validatorImpl"/> 
     ...
</bean>

Thanks.

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Without knowing what ParentController is, we've no way of helping –  skaffman Mar 18 '10 at 14:43
    
Why do u need to know what ParentController is?? –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Mar 18 '10 at 14:45
    
Because you're injecting a null into it, and we're not psychic. –  skaffman Mar 18 '10 at 14:47
    
Is that clearer now, or you need more information? –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Mar 18 '10 at 14:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Explicitly setting a property to <null/> isn't the same as not setting it. The property's setter method may check that the value you're injecting is non-null, for example.

If you look at the source code for BaseCommandController (which is a superclass of your controller), you'll see that setValidator does no such checking. However, when the bean is initialized in initApplicationContext(), it iterates over the array of validators, assuming they're all non-null, and will throw a NPE if there's a null in that array, which if likely what's happening here.

Unfortunately, there is no way to "unset" a property that has been configured in a parent bean definition. You'll need to rearrange the definitions so that the parent doesn't set it.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with u, but that's a pain in the neck!! –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Mar 18 '10 at 15:28
    
As u said it seems that the NPE is the result of calling this.validators[i].supports(this.commandClass) (What returns null) after calling setValidator (null) public final void setValidator(Validator validator) { this.validators = new Validator[] {validator}; } –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Mar 18 '10 at 15:35

I think the problem is in your parent you are either using the validator in either setter method or in afterPropertiesSet. That may be the reason for the NPE. Check it once, if you are not using the validator which in your case is null anywhere in the initialization phases in your parent class, it should work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not the problem, as I stated, declaring it neither in the parent nor in the child cause any problem. –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Mar 18 '10 at 15:26

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