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I want to find the signed value of a number in C. So if I have a number let's say 10, in binary (in 8 bits) it would be 0000 0110. How do I get the signed number in two's complement 1111 1110, which is -2. Using simple bitwise operations, shifts, masks, how do I do this conversion? I've been stuck on this for hours.

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I'm not sure what is "signed complement", can you give more examples of input -> expected output? –  Lashane Jul 11 '14 at 22:18
    
Not clear what is asked. –  ouah Jul 11 '14 at 22:27
    
The additive complement of a number is zero minus the number. The 2's complement of 0000 0110 would be 1111 1010. –  Hot Licks Jul 11 '14 at 22:56
    
Do you know how this conversion works on a mathematical level? If not, this does not seem to be a programming question. –  Adrian Heine Jul 11 '14 at 22:59

2 Answers 2

If we already have the binary representation of a positive number n, then the bitwise representation of -n is ~n+1, in other words, 1 plus the bitwise negation of the positive number.

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~n+1 for 0000 0110 will give 1111 1001+1 = 1111 1010, not 1111 1110 as OP wants –  Lashane Jul 11 '14 at 22:21
    
That's not what he wants. The binary representation was 10, and the second was -2. They were not related in the question. –  murgatroid99 Jul 11 '14 at 22:25

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two%27s_complement

I want to find the signed value of a number in C. So if I have a number let's say 10, in binary (in 8 bits) it would be 0000 0110. How do I get the signed number in two's complement 1111 1110, which is -2.

You're confused. The 8-bit two's complement of 0000 0110 is 1111 1010 (-10 if interpreted as signed, or 6 if interpreted as unsigned). The whole point is that a bit pattern and its (unsigned) n-bit two's complement add up to 2^n.

Using simple bitwise operations, shifts, masks, how do I do this conversion? I've been stuck on this for hours.

Here:

unsigned char x = 0x0a;
unsigned char twos_complement = (~x) + 1;
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Umm... for completeness: binary 00000110 is decimal 6, and 11111010 is decimal -6 if treated as an 8-bit 2's complement number. –  gmch Jul 11 '14 at 23:07

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