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Trying to get a better Understand on View Transform, using Right Handed Rule. If anyone can help clarify the given slide. For example what is C standing and why is it negative also why is an inverse applied to the matrix, and finally what is the simplest form of these matrices concatenated. Thank you for your time and help! enter image description here

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(Cx, Cy, Cz) are the coordinates of the camera (i.e. the point from which rays are cast) as far as I understand. Try 3dgep.com/?p=1700 for more details – LightningIsMyName Jul 12 '14 at 14:47
    
why are they negative is it cause in camera view the Z is inverse?? If so how does that effect the Cx and Cy to be negative as well? – KSM Jul 12 '14 at 15:37
up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • Assume we have a 3D point P = (Px,Py,Pz) in real world coordinates
  • Let u be the vector pointing "left" (as seen by the camera)
  • Let v be the vector pointing "up" (as seen by the camera)
  • Let w be the vector pointing "forward" (as seen by the camera)
  • u, v and w are orthogonal, and I assume that we already normalized them (so now we have an orthonormal base)
  • Let C = (Cx, Cy, Cz) be the location of the 'eye' of the camera

If we were to manually translate P to camera coordinates, it would have been done like this:

  • Find the location relative to the camera Pc = P - C
  • We can find the u (/v/w) component of the point by computing the dot product of u (/v/w) and Pc
  • So the coordinates of P as seen by the camera are (<Pc,u>,<Pc,v>,<Pc,w>), where <x,y> denotes the dot product of x and y

And this matches exactly to the given matrices:

| ux  uy  uz  0 |   | 1  0  0 -Cx |   | Px |
| vx  vy  vz  0 | X | 0  1  0 -Cy | X | Py |
| wx  wy  wz  0 |   | 0  0  1 -Cz |   | Pz |
|  0   0   0  1 |   | 0  0  0   1 |   |  1 |

  | ux  uy  uz  0 |   | Px - Cx |
= | vx  vy  vz  0 | X | Py - Cy |
  | wx  wy  wz  0 |   | Pz - Cz |
  |  0   0   0  1 |   |  1      |

  | <Pc,u> |
= | <Pc,v> |
  | <Pc,w> |
  |      1 |

So basically, the big matrix you have there is indeed the one that converts points from absolute coordinates to camera coordinates

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Thanks this makes things a lot more clearer. – KSM Jul 12 '14 at 16:07
    
But just another quick question shouldnt the matrix be added as so for the last part ?? ux*(Px-Cx) + uy*(Py-Cy)+ uz*(Pz-Cz) + 1 – KSM Jul 12 '14 at 16:16
    
Oh wait <Pc,u> was just general form right? – KSM Jul 12 '14 at 16:20
1  
<Pc,u> was indeed a short form for writing ux*(Px-Cx) + uy*(Py-Cy)+ uz*(Pz-Cz) (note that I don't have a +1 in the last coordinate since the matrix has a 0 in it's last column of that row) – LightningIsMyName Jul 12 '14 at 16:21
1  
Note the transpose on the matrix as it's written in your slides – LightningIsMyName Jul 13 '14 at 20:59

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