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It seems to me that I have to retrieve an object before I delete it with entity framework like below

var customer = context.Customers.First(c => c.Id = 1);

context.DeleteObject(customer);

context.Savechanges();

So I need to hit database twice. Is there a easier way?

Thanks

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j.mp/f0x0Bh is your answer. This is a nice and generic way of doing it –  BritishDeveloper Mar 28 '11 at 14:16

6 Answers 6

If you dont want to query for it just create an entity, and then delete it.

Customer customer  = new Customer() {  Id = 1   } ; 
context.AttachTo("Customers", customer);
context.DeleteObject(customer);
context.Savechanges();
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The same as @Nix with a small change to be strongly typed:

If you don't want to query for it just create an entity, and then delete it.

                Customer customer = new Customer () { Id = id };
                context.Customers.Attach(customer);
                context.Customers.DeleteObject(customer);
                context.SaveChanges();
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1  
Not perfect as it throws an exception if the object is missing: "DbUpdateConcurrencyException: Store update, insert, or delete statement affected an unexpected number of rows (0)." I'd like it to ignore this, like a DELETE statement would. –  Dunc Jan 22 at 15:34

Similar question here.

With Entity Framework 5 there is Entity Framework Extended Library. Available on NuGet. Then you can write something like:

context.Users.Delete(u => u.Id == id);

It is also useful for bulk deletes.

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7  
It defies reason that this isn't part of the core EF library by now. –  nathanchere Dec 4 '13 at 6:18
1  
@FerretallicA - agreed. –  acarlon Dec 8 '13 at 4:15

Raw sql query is fastest way I suppose

public void DeleteCustomer(int id)
{
   using (var context = new Context())
   {
      const string query = "DELETE FROM [dbo].[Customers] WHERE [id]={0}";
      var rows = context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(query,id);
      // rows >= 1 - count of deleted rows,
      // rows = 0 - nothing to delete.
   }
}
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This defeats the purpose of using strongly typed object funtionality in EF. –  LawMan Mar 4 at 17:20

In Entity Framework 6 the delete action is Remove. Here is an example

Customer customer = new Customer () { Id = id };
context.Customers.Attach(customer);
context.Customers.Remove(customer);
context.SaveChanges();
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If you're using EF 1.0, that is the most concise way to do it. There may be other ways but they're more trouble than they're worth IMHO.

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