Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Given a datasource like that:

var c = new Car[]
{
  new Car{ Color="Blue", Price=28000},
  new Car{ Color="Red", Price=54000},
  new Car{ Color="Pink", Price=9999},
  // ..
};

How can I find the index of the first car satisfying a certain condition with LINQ?

EDIT:

I could think of something like this but it looks horrible:

int firstItem = someItems.Select((item, index) => new    
{    
    ItemName = item.Color,    
    Position = index    
}).Where(i => i.ItemName == "purple")    
  .First()    
  .Position;

Will it be the best to solve this with a plain old loop?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by nawfal, rene, Pierre-Luc Pineault, BradleyDotNET, Adam Eberbach May 20 at 1:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    

9 Answers 9

up vote 62 down vote accepted

An IEnumerable is not an ordered set.
Although most IEnumerables are ordered, some (such as Dictionary or HashSet) are not.

Therefore, LINQ does not have an IndexOf method.

However, you can write one yourself:

///<summary>Finds the index of the first item matching an expression in an enumerable.</summary>
///<param name="items">The enumerable to search.</param>
///<param name="predicate">The expression to test the items against.</param>
///<returns>The index of the first matching item, or -1 if no items match.</returns>
public static int FindIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, bool> predicate) {
    if (items == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("items");
    if (predicate == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("predicate");

    int retVal = 0;
    foreach (var item in items) {
        if (predicate(item)) return retVal;
        retVal++;
    }
    return -1;
}
///<summary>Finds the index of the first occurence of an item in an enumerable.</summary>
///<param name="items">The enumerable to search.</param>
///<param name="item">The item to find.</param>
///<returns>The index of the first matching item, or -1 if the item was not found.</returns>
public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, T item) { return items.FindIndex(i => EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(item, i)); }
share|improve this answer
25  
Although it does have an ElementAt method. Which takes an index as the argument. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 18 '10 at 16:37
4  
Because that's what all of the other LINQ methods use. It makes the delegate signature clearer in the tooltip. Predicate, Comparison, and friends were effectively replaced by the Func delegates in .Net 3.5. –  SLaks Mar 18 '10 at 16:45
4  
@SLaks, since this method already exists and is well known in the List<T> class, you should name it FindIndex and it should take a Predicate<T> instead of Func<T, bool>. The IndexOf takes a T object instead of a selector. Remember, consistency is the #1 strong point of the CLI: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x1xzf2ca.aspx –  Sam Harwell Mar 18 '10 at 17:18
4  
@280Z28: LINQ is already inconsist with List<T> - FindAll(Predicate<T>) vs. Where(Func<T, bool>), Exists(Predicate<T>) vs. Any(Func<T, bool>), ConvertAll(Converter<T, TOutput>) vs. Select(Func<T1, T2>), etc. –  SLaks Mar 18 '10 at 17:28
6  
@SLaks: With all the other methods that rely on the order (ElementAt, First, Last, Skip and friends) I don't think IndexOf would be too far-fetched. –  Matti Virkkunen May 14 '12 at 12:39
myCars.Select((v, i) => new {car = v, index = i}).First(myCondition).index;

or the slightly shorter

myCars.Select((car, index) => new {car, index}).First(myCondition).index;
share|improve this answer
3  
I just used this and it works fine for me. how does this differ from the marked answer? –  Aaron Anodide Mar 1 '11 at 0:27
    
You are using ordered collection (such as Car[]), thus marked answer doesn't apply to your case... you couldn't use this on Dictionary or Hashset. –  kape123 Aug 18 '11 at 22:25
1  
@kape123: This certainly also can be used for Dictionary and Hashset. Obviously the index returned isn't as "well defined" as an index in an ordered collection, but it can still be used with ElementAt to retrieve the matched element. –  Martin Liversage Oct 14 '11 at 8:23
8  
The big difference is that this will throw an exception if myCondition is not met by any of the items where as the marked answer returns -1 in that case. –  juharr Feb 3 '12 at 15:54
4  
@ProfK be careful with the FirstOrDefault, the default of a class in null, calling .index on a null with throw an exception. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Sep 26 '12 at 15:26
myCars.TakeWhile(car => !myCondition(car)).Count();

It works! Think about it. The index of the first matching item equals the number of (not matching) item before it.

Story time

I too dislike the horrible standard solution you already suggested in your question. Like the accepted answer I went for a plain old loop although with a slight modification:

public static int FindIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Predicate<T> predicate) {
    int index = 0;
    foreach (var item in items) {
        if (predicate(item)) break;
        index++;
    }
    return index;
}

Note that it will return the number of items instead of -1 when there is no match. But let's ignore this minor annoyance for now. In fact the horrible standard solution crashes in that case and I consider returning an index that is out-of-bounds superior.

What happens now is ReSharper telling me Loop can be converted into LINQ-expression. While most of the time the feature worsens readability, this time the result was awe-inspiring. So Kudos to the JetBrains.

Analysis

Pros

  • Concise
  • Combinable with other LINQ
  • Avoids newing anonymous objects
  • Only evaluates the enumerable until the predicate matches for the first time

Therefore I consider it optimal in time and space while remaining readable.

Cons

  • Not quite obvious at first
  • Does not return -1 when there is no match

Of course you can always hide it behind an extension method. And what to do best when there is no match heavily depends on the context.

share|improve this answer
1  
adding simple isFound boolean before loop, setting this variable to true before break statement and comparing to it before returning from function would solve -1 problem –  fex Feb 11 '13 at 21:15

I will make my contribution here... why? just because :p Its a different implementation, based on the Any LINQ extension, and a delegate. Here it is:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static int IndexOf<T>(
            this IEnumerable<T> list, 
            Predicate<T> condition) {               
        int i = -1;
        return list.Any(x => { i++; return condition(x); }) ? i : -1;
    }
}

void Main()
{
    TestGetsFirstItem();
    TestGetsLastItem();
    TestGetsMinusOneOnNotFound();
    TestGetsMiddleItem();   
    TestGetsMinusOneOnEmptyList();
}

void TestGetsFirstItem()
{
    // Arrange
    var list = new string[] { "a", "b", "c", "d" };

    // Act
    int index = list.IndexOf(item => item.Equals("a"));

    // Assert
    if(index != 0)
    {
        throw new Exception("Index should be 0 but is: " + index);
    }

    "Test Successful".Dump();
}

void TestGetsLastItem()
{
    // Arrange
    var list = new string[] { "a", "b", "c", "d" };

    // Act
    int index = list.IndexOf(item => item.Equals("d"));

    // Assert
    if(index != 3)
    {
        throw new Exception("Index should be 3 but is: " + index);
    }

    "Test Successful".Dump();
}

void TestGetsMinusOneOnNotFound()
{
    // Arrange
    var list = new string[] { "a", "b", "c", "d" };

    // Act
    int index = list.IndexOf(item => item.Equals("e"));

    // Assert
    if(index != -1)
    {
        throw new Exception("Index should be -1 but is: " + index);
    }

    "Test Successful".Dump();
}

void TestGetsMinusOneOnEmptyList()
{
    // Arrange
    var list = new string[] {  };

    // Act
    int index = list.IndexOf(item => item.Equals("e"));

    // Assert
    if(index != -1)
    {
        throw new Exception("Index should be -1 but is: " + index);
    }

    "Test Successful".Dump();
}

void TestGetsMiddleItem()
{
    // Arrange
    var list = new string[] { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e" };

    // Act
    int index = list.IndexOf(item => item.Equals("c"));

    // Assert
    if(index != 2)
    {
        throw new Exception("Index should be 2 but is: " + index);
    }

    "Test Successful".Dump();
}        
share|improve this answer
    
By the way, the code is runnable on the LINQPad –  Marcel Valdez Orozco Apr 10 '12 at 4:23

Here is a little extension I just put together.

public static class PositionsExtension
{
    public static Int32 Position<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
                                          Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
    {
        return Positions<TSource>(source, predicate).FirstOrDefault();
    }
    public static IEnumerable<Int32> Positions<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, 
                                                        Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
    {
        if (typeof(TSource) is IDictionary)
        {
            throw new Exception("Dictionaries aren't supported");
        }

        if (source == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("source is null");
        }
        if (predicate == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("predicate is null");
        }
        var found = source.Where(predicate).First();
        var query = source.Select((item, index) => new
            {
                Found = ReferenceEquals(item, found),
                Index = index

            }).Where( it => it.Found).Select( it => it.Index);
        return query;
    }
}

Then you can call it like this.

IEnumerable<Int32> indicesWhereConditionIsMet = 
      ListItems.Positions(item => item == this);

Int32 firstWelcomeMessage ListItems.Position(msg =>               
      msg.WelcomeMessage.Contains("Hello"));
share|improve this answer

Simply do :

int index = List.FindIndex(your condition);

E.g.

int index = cars.FindIndex(c => c.ID == 150);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - although LINQ deals only with IEnumerable, this answer made me realize that in my case it was OK to convert the IEnumerable to list and then call FindIndex –  beluchin Dec 29 '13 at 6:39

Here's an implementation of the highest-voted answer that returns -1 when the item is not found:

public static int FindIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, bool> predicate)
{
    var itemsWithIndices = items.Select((item, index) => new { Item = item, Index = index });
    var matchingIndices =
        from itemWithIndex in itemsWithIndices
        where predicate(itemWithIndex.Item)
        select (int?)itemWithIndex.Index;

    return matchingIndices.FirstOrDefault() ?? -1;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Just use DefaultIfEmpty(-1) –  Tim Schmelter Jun 13 at 19:00
    
@TimSchmelter, thanks; I don't think I've used that method before. How is it better than the way I've done it here? Do you think it's more readable? –  Sam Jun 14 at 0:15

yes, if you need the exact index the previous answers where good. But what if all you need is to get the last object, and see if the current one isn't the last object?

I had a DataSet, and used ds.Tables[0].AsEnumarable(), and then used field("columnName") and stringBuilder.Append(","), except on the last row. So instead of just ds.Tables[0].AsEnumarable(), I used ds.Tables[0].AsEnumarable().ToList(). Because otherwise, I had to instantiate the last row like that: var lastRow = table.Last(), and then check in my foreach if the current row isn't the last one (row != lastRow). I didn't like this solution. I preferred using "if (table.IndexOf(row) != table.Count - 1).

share|improve this answer
    
-1 bad formatting and no code example. –  Marcel Valdez Orozco Jul 28 at 1:26
int idx = 0;
var lst = someList.OrderBy(elt => elt.wathever).Where(elt =>
{
    // Here you are : you've got yourself an index
    idx++;
    return idx % 2 == 0;
});
share|improve this answer
    
-1 because this doesn't work. –  Sam Jun 4 '13 at 6:01
    
Did you even try? –  Serge Jun 4 '13 at 7:15
    
Yes. Did you? It seems completely broken. –  Sam Jun 4 '13 at 8:48
    
Worked fine for me. –  Serge Jun 4 '13 at 10:07
1  
By calling OrderBy, you are destroying the original ordering of the enumeration from which the index should be retrieved. –  O. R. Mapper Apr 2 at 19:46

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.