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Let's say I have a program that runs continuously, waiting for order from a program with standard input. The method that keeps waiting for order is called "run" using while.

As you see, when run() gets certain order, they pass the order to certain function.

When I run the program, every time I give a command that can cause an error (say: Index error), it breaks and shut down (obviously)

I decided to try to catch the error with try/except

def a(order):
    try:
        <some algorithm>
        return something
    except Exception, error:
        stderr.write(error)
        stderr.flush()
def b(order):
    try:
        <some algorithm>
        return something
    except Exception, error:
        stderr.write(error)
        stderr.flush()
def run(order)
    while stdin.notclosed:
        try:
            read stdin
            if stdin==specific order :
                x=a(stdin order)
            else:
                x=b(stdin order)
        except Exception,error:
            stderr.write(error)
            stderr.flush()
run()

However, it seems the program that gives the order can't read the error. From my analyst, it seems the program that gives order only start reading stderr after the program that reads the order ends. However, due to try/catch, the program never ends. Is there anyway that to catch the error, write it, then end it. (The error can came from any function)

PS: Let's assume you can't modify or read the program that gives order. (This is competition, the reason I said this, is since that when I access the stderr, it's empty.)

share|improve this question
    
you want to capture the error and stop execution or you want to capture which function caused the error and stop execution. –  Anurag Jul 13 '14 at 9:11
    
Can you run this program once per order (get rid of the while), hence giving your untouchable parent the opportunity to read stderr each time? Does your parent read stdout, or is it the same as stderr? If not, is it watching files? How does it expect to be notified of errors? –  uʍop ǝpısdn Jul 13 '14 at 9:20
    
You can end an except suite with a raise statement to re-raise the last exception that was active. –  martineau Jul 13 '14 at 12:21
    
@Anurag I'd like to capture the error and stop the execution. Like just stops when you don't have any error exception. –  Realdeo Jul 13 '14 at 15:35
    
@uʍop ǝpısdn, unfortunately, I have no idea about the program that gives the order (due to competition), but I can tell you the program doesn't read the stderr (just the stdout), so when a error comes, I can download the stderr in a txt. (They once told me that the stderr has nothing to do with the program). My program unfortunately, must run all the time. –  Realdeo Jul 13 '14 at 15:36

2 Answers 2

Not sure if this does what you need, but you could re-raise the exception being handled by adding an emptyraisestatement at the end of theexceptblock as shown below. This will either cause the exception to be handled by the next higher-uptry/exceptblock, if there is one, or terminate the program if there isn't.

Example:

def a(order):
    try:
        <some algorithm>
        return something
    except Exception, error:
        stderr.write(error)
        stderr.flush()
        raise  # re-raise exception
share|improve this answer
    def a(order):
        try:
            <some algorithm>
            return something
        except Exception, error:
           import traceback
           trace = traceback.format_exc()
           return trace

    def b(order):
        try:
            <some algorithm>
            return something
        except Exception, error:
           import traceback
           trace = traceback.format_exc()
           return trace

    def run(order)
        while stdin.notclosed:
            try:
                read stdin
                if stdin==specific order :
                    x=a(stdin order)
                else:
                    x=b(stdin order)
                #check if x == trace then sys.exit()
            except Exception,error:
                stderr.write(error)
                stderr.flush()
    run()
share|improve this answer

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