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I'm doing an insert query where most of many columns would need to be updated to the new values if a unique key already existed. It goes something like this:

INSERT INTO lee(exp_id, created_by, 
                location, animal, 
                starttime, endtime, entct, 
                inact, inadur, inadist, 
                smlct, smldur, smldist, 
                larct, lardur, lardist, 
                emptyct, emptydur)
SELECT id, uid, t.location, t.animal, t.starttime, t.endtime, t.entct, 
       t.inact, t.inadur, t.inadist, 
       t.smlct, t.smldur, t.smldist, 
       t.larct, t.lardur, t.lardist, 
       t.emptyct, t.emptydur 
FROM tmp t WHERE uid=x
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE ...; 
//update all fields to values from SELECT, 
//       except for exp_id, created_by, location, animal, 
//       starttime, endtime

I'm not sure what the syntax for the UPDATE clause should be. How do I refer to the current row from the SELECT clause?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 66 down vote accepted

MySQL will assume the part before the equals references the columns named in the INSERT INTO clause, and the second part references the SELECT columns.

INSERT INTO lee(exp_id, created_by, location, animal, starttime, endtime, entct, 
                inact, inadur, inadist, 
                smlct, smldur, smldist, 
                larct, lardur, lardist, 
                emptyct, emptydur)
SELECT id, uid, t.location, t.animal, t.starttime, t.endtime, t.entct, 
       t.inact, t.inadur, t.inadist, 
       t.smlct, t.smldur, t.smldist, 
       t.larct, t.lardur, t.lardist, 
       t.emptyct, t.emptydur 
FROM tmp t WHERE uid=x
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE entct=t.entct, inact=t.inact, ...
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3  
@dnagirl: TIP: don't try to update any of the PK columns, only those that need updating go into the list –  lexu Mar 18 '10 at 18:18
19  
Your suggested syntax works and the t. is required. I also found an article on xaprb (xaprb.com/blog/2006/02/21/flexible-insert-and-update-in-mysql) that uses this syntax: on duplicate key update b = values(b), c = values(c). This also works. –  dnagirl Mar 18 '10 at 18:43
    
@dnagirl, you just made my day. Thanks. –  WhatIsOpenID Oct 13 '10 at 14:01
1  
Note: This will not work when SELECT statement has a GROUP BY clause –  joHN Jul 30 at 11:44
1  
@john What to do if SELECT statement has a GROUP BY clause –  Kathir Aug 26 at 13:15

try REPLACE INTO instead of INSERT, was ok for me

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If you read the docs for REPLACE INTO.. you'll discover it is inappropriate for what I was doing. Specifically, REPLACE INTO... will delete and replace a record rather than just updating it. Since I wanted to maintain my original keys, this would not work. BTW, welcome to SO. –  dnagirl Nov 10 at 18:15

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