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I have a form in my django app where users can upload files.
How can i set a limit to the uploaded file size so that if a user uploads a file larger than my limit the form won't be valid and it will throw an error?

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1  
Similar question with answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/2894914/… –  Dave Gallagher May 23 '11 at 23:57
1  
@DaveGallagher: Using a upload handler does not present the user with a pretty error message, it just drops the connection. –  Emil Stenström Jul 4 '12 at 12:02
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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This code might help:

# Add to your settings file
CONTENT_TYPES = ['image', 'video']
# 2.5MB - 2621440
# 5MB - 5242880
# 10MB - 10485760
# 20MB - 20971520
# 50MB - 5242880
# 100MB 104857600
# 250MB - 214958080
# 500MB - 429916160
MAX_UPLOAD_SIZE = "5242880"

#Add to a form containing a FileField and change the field names accordingly.
from django.template.defaultfilters import filesizeformat
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _
from django.conf import settings
def clean_content(self):
    content = self.cleaned_data['content']
    content_type = content.content_type.split('/')[0]
    if content_type in settings.CONTENT_TYPES:
        if content._size > settings.MAX_UPLOAD_SIZE:
            raise forms.ValidationError(_('Please keep filesize under %s. Current filesize %s') % (filesizeformat(settings.MAX_UPLOAD_SIZE), filesizeformat(content._size)))
    else:
        raise forms.ValidationError(_('File type is not supported'))
    return content

Taken from: Django Snippets - Validate by file content type and size

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You can use this snippet formatChecker. What it does is

  • it lets you specify what file formats are allowed to be uploaded.

  • and lets you set the limit of file size of the file to be uploaded.

First. Create a file named formatChecker.py inside the app where the you have the model that has the FileField that you want to accept a certain file type.

This is your formatChecker.py:

from django.db.models import FileField
from django.forms import forms
from django.template.defaultfilters import filesizeformat
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _

class ContentTypeRestrictedFileField(FileField):
    """
    Same as FileField, but you can specify:
        * content_types - list containing allowed content_types. Example: ['application/pdf', 'image/jpeg']
        * max_upload_size - a number indicating the maximum file size allowed for upload.
            2.5MB - 2621440
            5MB - 5242880
            10MB - 10485760
            20MB - 20971520
            50MB - 5242880
            100MB 104857600
            250MB - 214958080
            500MB - 429916160
"""
def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
    self.content_types = kwargs.pop("content_types")
    self.max_upload_size = kwargs.pop("max_upload_size")

    super(ContentTypeRestrictedFileField, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

def clean(self, *args, **kwargs):        
    data = super(ContentTypeRestrictedFileField, self).clean(*args, **kwargs)

    file = data.file
    try:
        content_type = file.content_type
        if content_type in self.content_types:
            if file._size > self.max_upload_size:
                raise forms.ValidationError(_('Please keep filesize under %s. Current filesize %s') % (filesizeformat(self.max_upload_size), filesizeformat(file._size)))
        else:
            raise forms.ValidationError(_('Filetype not supported.'))
    except AttributeError:
        pass        

    return data

Second. In your models.py, add this:

from formatChecker import ContentTypeRestrictedFileField

Then instead of using 'FileField', use this 'ContentTypeRestrictedFileField'.

Example:

class Stuff(models.Model):
    title = models.CharField(max_length=245)
    handout = ContentTypeRestrictedFileField(upload_to='uploads/', content_types=['video/x-msvideo', 'application/pdf', 'video/mp4', 'audio/mpeg', ],max_upload_size=5242880,blank=True, null=True)

You can change the value of 'max_upload_size' to the limit of file size that you want. You can also change the values inside the list of 'content_types' to the file types that you want to accept.

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3  
what a great underrated answer! More complete and slightly better than the validated one. –  Geoffroy CALA Mar 8 '12 at 13:47
    
gives an error __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument content_types while creating a database –  Dinesh Goel Apr 23 at 4:42
    
Indentation is wrong in the class above, that's why it fails –  jacoor Jul 2 at 13:57
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I believe that django form receives file only after it was uploaded completely.That's why if somebody uploads 2Gb file, you're much better off with web-server checking for size on-the-fly.

See this mail thread for more info.

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1  
I agree with you on this but in my case i need the limit to be in Django. –  daniels Mar 30 '10 at 17:46
    
daniels is correct. App logic should be in the app, not the web-server... –  Cerin Aug 16 '12 at 14:38
    
At the time of writing (2 years ago), django would simply DoS with heavy file upload. Right now things are different, and depending on the purpose of the restriction it could go either way –  Dmitry Shevchenko Aug 16 '12 at 17:59
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Just a short note on the snippet that was included in this thread:

Take a look at this snippet: http://www.djangosnippets.org/snippets/1303/

It was very usefull, however it's including a few minor mistakes. More robust code should look like this:

# Add to your settings file
CONTENT_TYPES = ['image', 'video']
# 2.5MB - 2621440
# 5MB - 5242880
# 10MB - 10485760
# 20MB - 20971520
# 50MB - 5242880
# 100MB - 104857600
# 250MB - 214958080
# 500MB - 429916160
MAX_UPLOAD_SIZE = "5242880"

#Add to a form containing a FileField and change the field names accordingly.
from django.template.defaultfilters import filesizeformat
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _
from django.conf import settings
def clean_content(self):
    if content != None:
        content = self.cleaned_data['content']
        content_type = content.content_type.split('/')[0]
        if content_type in settings.CONTENT_TYPES:
            if content._size > int(settings.MAX_UPLOAD_SIZE):
                raise forms.ValidationError(_(u'Please keep filesize under %s. Current filesize %s') % (filesizeformat(settings.MAX_UPLOAD_SIZE), filesizeformat(content._size)))
        else:
            raise forms.ValidationError(_(u'File type is not supported'))
        return content

There are just a few improvements:

First of all I'm detecting if the file field is empty (None) - without it, Django will cast an exception in web browser.

Next is type casting in int(settings.MAX_UPLOAD_SIZE), because that setting value is a string. Strings cannot be used for comparing with numbers.

Last but not least, the unicode 'u' prefix in ValidationError function.

Thank you very much for this snippet!

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