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Given an element like:

<polymer-element name="custom-element">
    <template>
        <style>
            #container {
                color: red;
            }
        </style>
        <div id="container" on-click="{{clickContainer}}">
            ... lots of other stuff here ...
        </div>
    </template>
    <script>
        Polymer('custom-element', {
            clickContainer: function() {

            }
        });
    </script>
</polymer-element>

I'd like to have another element that wraps the first:

<polymer-element name="my-custom-element" extends="custom-element">
    <!-- extra styling -->
    <script>
        Polymer('my-custom-element', {
            clickContainer: function() {
                this.super();
            }
        });
    </script>
</polymer-element>

My problems:

  • What's the best way to specify additional styling ?
  • Can I wrap the base element in additional markup (like another container) ?
  • Can I select elements from the base element ? Something like <content select=".stuff"> but for the base's shadow markup.
share|improve this question
1  
These are good questions. I don't have answers for you yet but we are working on it. Specifically, we are dancing with the platform/spec teams about disposition of style resolution in sibling shadow-roots. I hope to have some answers for you soon. –  Scott Miles Jul 14 at 22:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+500
  • What's the best way to specify additional styling ?
  1. Put a template inside the subclass (my-custom-element), as usual.
  2. Include a <shadow></shadow> element where you want the superclass template to appear.
  3. Put a style tag into the new template.
  4. To style elements that come from the superclass template, use a selector like this:

:host::shadow .someclass { ... }

See example below.

  • Can I wrap the base element in additional markup (like another container) ?

Yes, you can put whatever markup you want around the <shadow></shadow>.

<div>
  <shadow></shadow>
</div>
  • Can I select elements from the base element? Something like <content select=".stuff"> but for the base's shadow markup.

No. You cannot project like that (it's the reverse direction from all other projections).

If you really want to cherry-pick nodes out of the older shadow-root, this can be done in code by pulling nodes directly out of this.shadowRoot.olderShadowRoot. But this can be tricky because the superclass may have expectations about the structure.

Example code:

<polymer-element name="my-custom-element" extends="custom-element">
<template>

  <style>
      /* note that :host::shadow rules apply 
         to all shadow-roots in this element,
         including this one */
      :host::shadow #container { 
        color: blue;
      }
      :host {
        /* older shadow-roots can inherit inheritable 
           styles like font-family */
        font-family: sans-serif;
      }
  </style>
  <p>
    <shadow></shadow>
  </p>

</template>
<script>

  Polymer('my-custom-element', {
    clickContainer: function() {
      this.super();
    }
  });

</script>
</polymer-element>

ProTips:

  • olderShadowRoot will exist whether or not you include the <shadow></shadow> tag, but it will not be part of the rendered DOM unless you do.
  • to prevent olderShadowRoot(s) from being created you can override parseDeclarations (source). Any of parseDeclarations, parseDeclaration, fetchTemplate can be overidden for various effects.
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain the example in #4 (and why you need that specific selector). Are there any alternative ways to style ? –  ionelmc Jul 16 at 21:29
    
Today, the native behavior is to scope styles in a shadow-root to that specific shadow-root. However, the :host::shadow selector refers to all shadow-roots in the current host, including inherited shadow-roots. It's a blunt tool, but it allows :host::shadow .foo to style anything with foo class in all shadow-roots of the current host. You can also do styling via `\deep\` combinator, but this is also blunt. We are pushing on the specs, as well as experimenting with meta-systems for improving ergonomics here, see core-style. –  Scott Miles Jul 18 at 23:27
    
Why do you need to have the <script> inside the <polymer-element> ? Eg: here it's outside: github.com/geelen/x-gif/blob/gh-pages/src/x-gif.html What's going on ? Why did they put it outside ? –  ionelmc Jul 22 at 19:23
    
You can put the script anywhere you want. However, in an import, if you put the script inside the <polymer-element> you can omit the element name when calling Polymer() (i.e. you can just call Polymer({ ... });). –  Scott Miles Jul 23 at 9:38
    
How come all the examples don't do this? Doesn't seem to be documented either (or I haven't looked properly). –  ionelmc Jul 23 at 18:38

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