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I am trying to Iterate directories in Perl, getting introspectable objects as result, mostly so I can print fields like mtime when I'm using Dumper on the returns from IO::All.

I have discovered, that it can be done, if in the module IO::All::File (for me, /usr/local/share/perl/5.10.1/IO/All/File.pm), I add the line field mtimef => undef;, and then modify its sub file so it runs $self->mtimef($self->mtime); (note, this field cannot have the same name (mtime) as the corresponding method/property, as those are dynamically assigned in IO::All). So, in essence, I'm not interested in "overloading", as in having the same name for multiple function signatures - I'd want to "replace" or "override" a class with its extended version (not sure how this is properly called), but under the same name; so all other classes that may use it, get on to using the extended version from that point on.

The best approach for me now would be, if I could somehow "replace" the IO::All::File class, from my actual "runnable" Perl script -- if somehow possible, by using the mechanisms for inheritance, so I can just add what is "extra". To show what I mean, here is an example:

use warnings;
use strict;

use Data::Dumper;
my @targetDirsToScan = ("./");

use IO::All -utf8 ;                          # Turn on utf8 for all io

# try to "replace" the IO::All::File class

{ # recursive inheritance!
  package IO::All::File;
  use IO::All::File -base;

  # hacks work if directly in /usr/local/share/perl/5.10.1/IO/All/File.pm

  field mtimef => undef; # hack

  sub file {
    my $self = shift;
    bless $self, __PACKAGE__;
    $self->name(shift) if @_;
    $self->mtimef($self->mtime); # hack
    return $self->_init;
  }

  1;
}

# main script start

my $io = io(@targetDirsToScan);
my @contents = $io->all(0);                    # Get all contents of dir
for my $contentry ( @contents ) {
  print Dumper \%{*$contentry};
}

... which fails with "Recursive inheritance detected in package 'IO::All::Filesys' at /usr/local/share/perl/5.10.1/IO/All/Base.pm line 13."; if you comment out the "recursive inheritance" section, it all works.

I'm sort of clear on why this happens with this kind of syntax - however, is there a syntax, or a way, that can be used to "replace" a class with its extended version but of the same name, similar to how I've tried it above? Obviously, I want the same name, so that I wouldn't have to change anything in IO::All (or any other files in the package). Also, I would preferably do this in the "runner" Perl script (so that I can have everything in a single script file, and I don't have to maintain multiple files) - but if the only way possible is to have a separate .pm file, I'd like to know about it as well.

So, is there a technique I could use for something like this?

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1 Answer 1

Well, I honestly have no idea what is going on, but I poked around with the code above, and it seems all that is required, is to remove the -base from the use IO::All::File statement; and the code otherwise seems to work as I expect it - that is, the package does get "overriden" - if you change this snippet in the code above:

# ...
{ # no more recursive inheritance!? IO::All::File gets overriden with this?!
  package IO::All::File;
  use IO::All::File; # -base; # just do not use `-base` here?!

  # hacks work if directly in /usr/local/share/perl/5.10.1/IO/All/File.pm

  field mtimef => undef; # hack

  sub file {
    my $self = shift;
    bless $self, __PACKAGE__;
    $self->name(shift) if @_;
    $self->mtimef($self->mtime); # hack
    print("!! *haxx0rz'd* file() reporting in\n");
    return $self->_init;
  }

  1;
}
# ...

I found this so unbelievable, I even added the print() there to make sure it is the "overriden" function that runs, and sure enough, it is; this is what I get in output:

...
!! *haxx0rz'd* file() reporting in
$VAR1 = {
          '_utf8' => 1,
          'mtimef' => 1394828707,
          'constructor' => sub { "DUMMY" },
          'is_open' => 0,
          'io_handle' => undef,
          'name' => './test.blg',
          '_encoding' => 'utf8',
          'package' => 'IO::All'
        };
...

... and sure enough,the field is there, as expected, too...

Well - I hope someone eventually puts a more qualified answer here; for the time being, I hope this is as good as a fix to my problems :) ...

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2  
Perl classes are "open". That is, once they are fully declared, it is still possible to add methods to them. (Or redefine existing methods, though use warnings will warn you about doing that.) That's all that's happening here. –  tobyink Jul 13 '14 at 21:16
    
Thanks for that, @tobyink - much appreciated. Cheers! –  sdaau Jul 13 '14 at 21:19

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