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I am sure this was done 1000 times in 1000 different places. The question is I want to know if there is a better/standard/faster way to check if current "time" is between two time values given in hh:mm:ss format. For example, my big business logic should not run between 18:00:00 and 18:30:00. So here is what I had in mind:

 public static  boolean isCurrentTimeBetween(String starthhmmss, String endhhmmss) throws ParseException{
  DateFormat hhmmssFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMddhh:mm:ss");
  Date now = new Date();
  String yyyMMdd = hhmmssFormat.format(now).substring(0, 8);

  return(hhmmssFormat.parse(yyyMMdd+starthhmmss).before(now) &&
    hhmmssFormat.parse(yyyMMdd+endhhmmss).after(now));
 }

Example test case:

  String doNotRunBetween="18:00:00,18:30:00";//read from props file
  String[] hhmmss = downTime.split(",");
  if(isCurrentTimeBetween(hhmmss[0], hhmmss[1])){
   System.out.println("NOT OK TO RUN");
  }else{
   System.out.println("OK TO RUN");
  }

What I am looking for is code that is better

  • in performance
  • in looks
  • in correctness

What I am not looking for

  • third-party libraries
  • Exception handling debate
  • variable naming conventions
  • method modifier issues
share|improve this question
5  
Not looking for third-party libraries excludes a lot of fanatic answers about Joda Time... –  JuanZe Mar 18 '10 at 20:12
1  
@skaffman Yes, Joda Time is great, but all I require for now is this one functionality related to time and date. –  ring bearer Mar 18 '10 at 20:34
    
@JuanZe - how do you do it with Jodatime? I have the same requirement and can do it with joda time. I need to find out if a current hour is in between two given hours. –  Andy Dufresne Jul 17 at 6:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

this is all you should need to do, this method is loosely coupled from the input and highly coherent.

boolean isNowBetweenDateTime(final Date s, final Date e)
{
    final Date now = new Date();
    return now.after(s) && now.before(e);
}

how you get the Date objects for start and end is irrelevant to comparing them. You are making things way more complicated than you need to with passing String representations around.

Here is a better way to get the start and end dates, again loosely coupled and highly coherent.

private Date dateFromHourMinSec(final String hhmmss)
{
    if (hhmmss.matches("^[0-2][0-9]:[0-5][0-9]:[0-5][0-9]$"))
    {
        final String[] hms = hhmmss.split(":");
        final GregorianCalendar gc = new GregorianCalendar();
        gc.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, Integer.parseInt(hms[0]));
        gc.set(Calendar.MINUTE, Integer.parseInt(hms[1]));
        gc.set(Calendar.SECOND, Integer.parseInt(hms[2]));
        gc.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
        return gc.getTime();
    }
    else
    {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(hhmmss + " is not a valid time, expecting HH:MM:SS format");
    }
}

Now you can make two well named method calls that will be pretty self documenting.

share|improve this answer
    
@fuzzy lollipop You possibly overlooked at the fact that I am just getting time in format of "hh:mm:ss" as the input. That is why specifically named it "isCurrentTimeBetween" –  ring bearer Mar 18 '10 at 20:19
3  
how you get the data is irrelevant, it should all be normalized into a java.util.Date object so it can be leveraged. –  Jarrod Roberson Mar 18 '10 at 20:26
    
Naming it a certain way doesn't make it not a bad design. Look up "loosely coupled" and "highly coherent". –  Jarrod Roberson Mar 18 '10 at 20:33
    
@fuzzy lollipop, sounds good. –  ring bearer Mar 18 '10 at 20:35
2  
Surely your regular expression needs to allow the hour to be [0-2][0-9]? Otherwise the4 majority of hours like 09:00:00 will throw the exception. –  William Stewart Mar 10 '12 at 15:03

As pointed out by Kevin, Fuzzy Lollipop's Regex won't pick up times between 14:00 and 19:00.

To get match a full 24 hour clock, you can use this:

if (hhmmss.matches("^([0-1][0-9]|2[0-3]):([0-5][0-9]):([0-5][0-9])$"))
{
    // Do stuff here
}
share|improve this answer

The following Class is something I just created out of some of the code from other answers. It encapsulates the behavior of a 'time period' without relating to specific days. Our system is using this Class to check if the current time is within one of our designated maintenance windows. i.e. 05:00:00 - 07:00:00

import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;

/**
*
* @author Adam Yocum
*/
public class ExclusionTimePeriod {
    private String timeStart;
    private String timeEnd;

    /**
    * @return the timeStart
    */
    public String getTimeStart() {
        return timeStart;
    }

    /**
    * @param timeStart the timeStart to set
    */
    public void setTimeStart(String timeStart) {
        if (timeStart.matches("^([0-1][0-9]|2[0-3]):([0-5][0-9]):([0-5][0-9])$"))
        {
            this.timeStart = timeStart;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(timeStart + " is not a valid time, expecting HH:MM:SS format");
        }

    }

    /**
    * @return the timeEnd
    */
    public String getTimeEnd() {
        return timeEnd;
    }

    /**
    * @param timeEnd the timeEnd to set
    */
    public void setTimeEnd(String timeEnd) {
        if (timeEnd.matches("^([0-1][0-9]|2[0-3]):([0-5][0-9]):([0-5][0-9])$"))
        {
            this.timeEnd = timeEnd;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(timeEnd + " is not a valid time, expecting HH:MM:SS format");
        }
    }

    private Date toDate(String hhmmss){
        final String[] hms = hhmmss.split(":");
        final GregorianCalendar gc = new GregorianCalendar();
        gc.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, Integer.parseInt(hms[0]));
        gc.set(Calendar.MINUTE, Integer.parseInt(hms[1]));
        gc.set(Calendar.SECOND, Integer.parseInt(hms[2]));
        gc.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
        Date date = gc.getTime();
        return date;
    }

    public boolean isNowInPeriod()
    {
        final Date now = new Date();
        return now.after(toDate(getTimeStart())) && now.before(toDate(getTimeEnd()));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){

        //Test All possible hours
        for(int hour=0;hour<=23;hour++){

            String hourStr = "";
            if(hour<=9){
                hourStr = "0"+hour;
            }else{
                hourStr = ""+hour;
            }

            for(int min=0;min<60;min++){
                String minStr = "";
                if(min<=9){
                    minStr = "0"+min;
                }else{
                    minStr = ""+min;
                }

                for(int sec=0;sec<60;sec++){
                    String secStr = "";
                    if(sec<=9){
                        secStr = "0"+sec;
                    }else{
                        secStr = ""+sec;
                    }

                    String hhmmss = hourStr+":"+minStr+":"+secStr;

                    ExclusionTimePeriod period = new ExclusionTimePeriod();
                    period.setTimeStart(hhmmss);
                    period.setTimeEnd(hhmmss);

                    System.out.println(hhmmss+" Ok");
                }
            }
        }


        //Test isInPeriod functionality
        ExclusionTimePeriod isInTest = new ExclusionTimePeriod();
        isInTest.setTimeStart("10:00:00");
        isInTest.setTimeEnd("10:43:00");

        System.out.println((new Date())+" is between "+isInTest.getTimeStart()+" and "+isInTest.getTimeEnd()+" = "+isInTest.isNowInPeriod());

    }
}
share|improve this answer

The dateFromHourMinSec method is flawed as written. It won't allow any hours where the seconde digit is greater than 3, e.g. 18:00:00. If you change it to allow [0-2][0-9] it will allow times such as 29:00:00. Have a fix for that?

share|improve this answer

protected by Jarrod Roberson Feb 13 '13 at 13:17

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