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I have an array consisting of unknown elements:

myary = [100, "hello", 20, 40, "hi"]

I want to put integer 10 after each element to make it into this:

myary = [100, 10, "hello", 10, 20, 10, 40, 10, "hi", 10]

Is there a way or a method to do it?

Another problem is that I need to add integer 10 before a string "hello".

myary = [100, 10,"hello", 20, 40, "hi"]
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And what have you tried? –  Yevgeniy Anfilofyev Jul 14 at 7:18
1  
What do you mean you don't know the length? Surely you can just do myary.size, right? Did you mean the size varies, i.e., it is different all the time? –  Daniël Knippers Jul 14 at 7:18
    
myary.map { |i| i == 'hello' ? i: [i, 10] }.flatten –  meagar Jul 14 at 7:19
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@meagar In that 'hello' case he wants to add 10 before the 'hello' element and otherwise not insert anything, so that should be i == 'hello' ? [10, i] : i. –  Daniël Knippers Jul 14 at 7:21
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Thanks all, Yevgeniy Anfilofyev, I have tried "insert" method and it's not nice for my case, and I don't know about flat_map method yet. Daniel Knippers, I don't know the length because the array is not predictable, I try to work in a program that my senior give me, the program give me an array that I can't see the length, and my senior forbid me to use .size or .length method(but this not the real problem, and sorry for not mention this in my question above). Well the real problem is I must insert that 10 integer in before specific data in the array. flat_map is what I want, thanks all. –  LuminaChen Jul 14 at 8:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Is this what you want ?

myary = [100, "hello", 20, 40, "hi"]
myary.flat_map { |i| [i, 10] }
# => [100, 10, "hello", 10, 20, 10, 40, 10, "hi", 10] 
myary.flat_map { |i| i == 'hello' ? [10, i] : i }
# => [100, 10,"hello", 20, 40, "hi"]

Read #flat_map method.

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Thank you, this is what I want. –  LuminaChen Jul 14 at 8:07
1  
Great answer, as always! –  SteveTurczyn Jul 14 at 8:08
    
Alternative ways: myary.zip([10].cycle).flatten and myary.inject([]) {|m,e| e=='hello' ? m.push(10,e): m << e} but would prefer also flat_map in this case. –  David Unric Jul 14 at 9:56
2  
@DavidUnric myary.zip([10].cycle) == myary.product([10]) –  Stefan Jul 14 at 11:41
    
@Stefan Good one ;) –  David Unric Jul 14 at 12:22

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