Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to implement something like a sandbox which can

  • eval given string
  • execute given block in the same context with eval
  • return the result of block

The aim of the sandbox is to inspect the contents - functions, variables, e.t.c. - of vulnerable codes.

Here is my spec

it 'returns return value of given block' do
  value = Sandbox.secure_eval('hoge = ["hoge", "fuga"]') do
    hoge[0]
  end
  expect(value).to eq('hoge')
end

and, this is my implementation of sandbox

require 'timeout'
module Sandbox
  def self.secure_eval(code, timeout: 5, safe_level: 2)
    raise ArgumentError, 'please set call back by block' unless block_given?

    proc = Proc.new do
      Timeout::timeout timeout do
        $SAFE = safe_level
        eval code do
          yield
        end
      end
    end

    proc.call
  end
end

But #secure_eval returns the result of eval, in this case ["hoge", "fuga"], and cannot capture the return value of the block.

How can I make it?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't think the block is called anywhere - eval does not accept a block... –  Uri Agassi Jul 14 at 10:46
1  
To quote Ruby Security: "However, $SAFE does not provide a secure environment for executing untrusted code." You should never rely on $SAFE or any other generic "safe code execution" mechanism built-in to Ruby (or into most other languages) to protect you from harm when executing untrusted (and potentially malicious) code. Your sandbox is not a sandbox at all! –  Holger Just Jul 14 at 13:33
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can return the result of eval to the block using yield. You just had to yield the value; thus I changed your yield to yield eval code. In the block you give to Sandbox.secure_eval you have to then bind this result to a block variable. The result of secure_eval will be the result of the block, like you wanted.

proc = Proc.new do
  Timeout::timeout timeout do
    $SAFE = safe_level
    yield eval code # <= This line changed
  end
end

Sandbox.secure_eval('hoge = ["hoge", "fuga"]') { |hoge| hoge[0] }
# => "hoge"

Sandbox.secure_eval('2 ** 4') { |result| result - 5 }
# => 11

In response to your comment; it turns out that with the aid of Kernel#Binding, we can get it to work more or less like you wanted. It feels rather like a hack so use it with caution.

I use the Binding to evaluate the code, which will have access to all defined variables. In addition, I define a method_missing for the Binding class so we can access the variables more easily. Without it, you would need to do eval('varname') rather than just varname. Per the comment of @hakcho who mentioned the monkey-patch solution that was in place is not ideal, I now use refinements which only locally changes the behavior of Binding (i.e., the method_missing implementation).

I have added an explicit block parameter to your method, which I use with instance_eval instead of yield. We can then access the variables directly in the block.

require 'timeout'

module Sandbox
  refine Binding do
    def method_missing(meth, *args, &block)
      self.eval(meth.to_s)
    end
  end

  def self.secure_eval(code, timeout: 5, safe_level: 2, &block)
    raise ArgumentError, 'please set call back by block' unless block_given?

    proc = Proc.new do
      Timeout::timeout timeout do
        $SAFE = safe_level
        binding = binding()
        binding.eval(code)
        binding.instance_eval(&block)
      end
    end

    proc.call
  end
end

using Sandbox # Activate the refinement so we can use x, y, z directly
Sandbox.secure_eval('x = [1,2,3]; y = 0; z = { key: "Hello!" }') do
   x[1]    # => 2
   y       # => 0
   z[:key] # => "Hello!"
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response. Your code seems to work, but I want my sandbox works as bellow: Sandbox.secure_eval('hoge = ["hoge", "fuga"];piyo = "piyo"') { hoge[0] } # => "hoge" Are there any way? –  Mekajiki Jul 14 at 12:15
    
@Mekajiki Ah so you want to be able to access any variables that you declared inside eval.. I don't know if that is possible, eval just returns the value of the last expression but not of intermediate expressions. Perhaps it is possible but I do not immediately know a way. –  Daniël Knippers Jul 14 at 12:49
    
@Mekajiki I have updated my post with a way to access other defined variables. –  Daniël Knippers Jul 14 at 13:13
    
You have to add *args and block to eval in Binding but doing that about the block is not trivial at all. –  hakcho Jul 14 at 13:19
2  
@hakcho I added the usage of refinements, which now require using Sandbox to enable the patched Binding behavior rather than enabling it globally. –  Daniël Knippers Jul 14 at 15:00
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.