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When the instance of Foo is created, the object oMyClass is passed and its copy constructor called. MyClass has a void pointer as member that is pointing to memory which is freed in the dtor. How do I implement the copy constructor correctly to avoid Segmentation faults when free() is called twice on the same memory?

This is my code:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    MyClass oMyClass();

    Foo oFoo(oMyClass);
} 

class MyClass
{
    public:
         MyClass()
         {
          struct foo *pFoo;
          buf = malloc(sizeof(*pFoo));
         }

         MyClass::MyClass(const MyClass& oMyClass)
         {
            printf("Copyconstructor called\n");
            //?
         }
         MyClass::~MyClass()
         {
          struct foo *pFoo = (struct foo *)buf;
          free(pFoo);
         }

    private:
      void* buf;

    };


/*Foo.h*/

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo( MyClass& oMyClass);
    Foo();
    ~Foo();
private:
    MyClass m_oMyClass;
};

/*Foo.cpp*/
Foo::Foo( MyClass& oMyClass): m_oMyClass(oMyClass)
{

}

Foo::Foo()
{
}
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5  
Why are you using a void* and malloc? –  Joseph Mansfield Jul 14 '14 at 13:05
    
Actually I am using libmtd and void* is actually libmtd_t. libmtd_open() is called in the constructor and allocates the memory. In The dtor libmtd_close() is called to free the memory. I thought it would be more readable this way. –  tzippy Jul 14 '14 at 13:09
2  
MyClass oMyClass(); is NOT an instantiation of MyClass. Use MyClass oMyClass; instead. –  icepack Jul 14 '14 at 13:12
    
@tzippy: Well, if buf represents a resource, then you should wrap it in another object (or use a reference counted pointer like std::shared_ptr) -- you don't want to copy the filehandle everywhere! –  Cameron Jul 14 '14 at 13:13

4 Answers 4

Don't write a copy-constructor at all (see Rule of Zero).

Instead, rely on smart pointers with custom deleters to do the resource management for you. A unique_ptr will give you movable ownership, a shared_ptr will give you shared ownership:

void* data = malloc(sizeof(*pFoo));
// either
std::unique_ptr<void, void(*)(void*)> foo(data, free);
// or
std::shared_ptr<void> foo(data, free);

Only if you really want to perform a deep copy of the enclosed data do you need to write a copy constructor (but you can still have the free being executed by a const unique_ptr in that case).

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You have to copy the data (or keep a reference count and only free the data when the last object referencing it is destroyed -- but this is almost certainly not what you want if the data is mutable).

MyClass::MyClass(const MyClass& oMyClass)
{
    buf = malloc(sizeof(foo));

    memcpy(buf, oMyClass.buf, sizeof(foo));
    // or new(buf) foo(*reinterpret_cast<foo*>(oMyClass.buf));
}

If you use the normal new/delete instead of malloc/free, you'd get copy constructors of foo for free...

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When you copy construct here, you need to create your own way of constructing the item.

The "default" is to simply copy the item to the new item. That's what's giving you the seg-fault, because when this is copied normally the pointer to foo will be the same in two places. Then, when destructing, you free the same memory twice.

So, in your copy constructor, you need to allocate new memory, and copy the contents of the memory as well:

MyClass::MyClass(const MyClass& oMyClass)
{
    buf = malloc(sizeof(foo));
    memcpy(buf, oMyClass.foo, sizeof(foo));            
    printf("Copyconstructor called\n");
    //?
}
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Well the question is here - what do you want to happen?

You can either share the memory between the two classes or make a copy of the memory.

Sharing the memory

Ideally use a class such as std::shared_ptr or boost::shared_ptr as that will automatically do reference counting for you. If you would like to do reference counting yourself, you will have to use the atomic intrinsics available in your compiler and have an integer malloced that will track the reference count.

Copying the memory

You can use std::memcpy to copy the memory into a newly allocated piece of memory:

MyClass::MyClass(const MyClass& other)
    : buf(malloc(sizeof(*buf)) {
  if (!buf) {
    throw std:bad_alloc();
  }
  std::memcpy(buf, other.buf, sizeof(*buf));
}
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