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can someone please help a newbie to get a timer on his game? :P I've been trying various approaches for the last day or two and I still can't get it working. Does anyone here have a solution?

Basically, I have a game where the aim is to collect 6 of the items in the fastest time. So of course I want a timer display that counts up from 0 where the user can keep track of how he is going.

Here are skeletons of the relevant classes-

public class StartingPoint extends Applet implements Runnable{

    Task t = new Task();
    Menu menu = new Menu();
    int num;
    public static enum STATE{
        MENU, 
        GAME,
    }; 

    public static STATE State = STATE.MENU;

    public void init() {
        setSize(800, 600);
    }

    public void start() {

        if(num < 2){
            Thread thread = new Thread(this);
            thread.start();
            num++;
        }
    }

    public void run() {

        if (State == STATE.GAME) {
            while (true) {
                repaint();

                try {
                    Thread.sleep(17);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        } else if (State == STATE.MENU) {

            while (true) {
                repaint();
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(17);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }

    }

    public void paint(Graphics g) {

        if (State == STATE.GAME) {

            ball.paint(g);

        } else if (State == STATE.MENU) {
            menu.render(g);
        }
    }
}



public class Task extends TimerTask {
    int seconds;
    int minutes;
    public String time;

    public void run() {

        seconds++;

        if (seconds == 60) {
            seconds = 0;
            minutes++;
        }

        String s = String.valueOf(seconds);
        String m = String.valueOf(minutes);

        if (seconds < 10) {
            time = (m + ":0" + s);
        } else {
            time = (m + ":" + s);
        }
    }
}



public class Start {

    private static Timer ourClock;
    private static TimerTask ourTask;

    public static void update(){
        ourClock = new Timer();
        ourTask = new Task();
        ourClock.scheduleAtFixedRate(ourTask,1000,1000);
    }
 }

I know it's a lot, but if someone could please help me to display the String "time" from the task class on my applet, it would be really helpful.

Thanks!

P.S note that it's an Applet not a JApplet. :-/ Also, if you can think of a way that doesn't use the current classes I have, go for it! I'm open to any suggestions, I just want to get this thing finished, I've been working on it for days...

This is the error message if I just try to paint the string "time"

Exception in thread "AWT-EventQueue-1" java.lang.NullPointerException: String is null
at sun.java2d.SunGraphics2D.drawString(SunGraphics2D.java:2880)
at Start.paint(Start.java:23)
at StartingPoint.paint(StartingPoint.java:229)
at StartingPoint.update(StartingPoint.java:215)
at sun.awt.RepaintArea.updateComponent(RepaintArea.java:255)
at sun.lwawt.LWRepaintArea.updateComponent(LWRepaintArea.java:47)
at sun.awt.RepaintArea.paint(RepaintArea.java:232)
at sun.lwawt.LWComponentPeer.handleJavaPaintEvent(LWComponentPeer.java:1312)
at sun.lwawt.LWComponentPeer.handleEvent(LWComponentPeer.java:1196)
at java.awt.Component.dispatchEventImpl(Component.java:4959)
at java.awt.Container.dispatchEventImpl(Container.java:2292)
at java.awt.Component.dispatchEvent(Component.java:4705)
at java.awt.EventQueue.dispatchEventImpl(EventQueue.java:746)
at java.awt.EventQueue.access$400(EventQueue.java:97)
at java.awt.EventQueue$3.run(EventQueue.java:697)
at java.awt.EventQueue$3.run(EventQueue.java:691)
at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
at java.security.ProtectionDomain$1.doIntersectionPrivilege(ProtectionDomain.java:75)
at java.security.ProtectionDomain$1.doIntersectionPrivilege(ProtectionDomain.java:86)
at java.awt.EventQueue$4.run(EventQueue.java:719)
at java.awt.EventQueue$4.run(EventQueue.java:717)
at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
at java.security.ProtectionDomain$1.doIntersectionPrivilege(ProtectionDomain.java:75)
at java.awt.EventQueue.dispatchEvent(EventQueue.java:716)
at java.awt.EventDispatchThread.pumpOneEventForFilters(EventDispatchThread.java:201)
at java.awt.EventDispatchThread.pumpEventsForFilter(EventDispatchThread.java:116)
at java.awt.EventDispatchThread.pumpEventsForHierarchy(EventDispatchThread.java:105)
at java.awt.EventDispatchThread.pumpEvents(EventDispatchThread.java:101)
at java.awt.EventDispatchThread.pumpEvents(EventDispatchThread.java:93)
at java.awt.EventDispatchThread.run(EventDispatchThread.java:82)
share|improve this question
    
May I ask why it's an Applet and not a JApplet? Even Swing is now EOL with JavaFX 8 out. AWT has been dead for so long that one couldn't even argue that it was pining for the fjords. –  Boris the Spider Jul 14 '14 at 14:46
    
I learnt the basics of Java from Mybringback on Youtube. This game is based off the game he made in the tutorial. For some reason he used Applet. I don't know why. The video was made in 2012, but by the way people are talking it sounds like Applet was outdated even then?? For my second game, I will definitely use JApplet. It's too late to go back for this game now though, I'm almost done with this one. (Unless the conversion is easy?) –  RJrules64 Jul 14 '14 at 14:53

1 Answer 1

I think you are looking at this from the wrong perspective.

In Java, you can create an inner class within your existing class. This will allow your instanced class to talk back to it's parent.

It is actually (from my limited experience) the standard for using Timers in Java.

public class Start {

    private static Timer ourClock;
    public static String time;


    public static void update(){
        ourClock = new Timer();
        ourClock.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask(){
            public void run() {
            int seconds;
            int minutes;

            seconds++;

            if (seconds == 60) {
                seconds = 0;
                minutes++;
            }

            String s = String.valueOf(seconds);
            String m = String.valueOf(minutes);

            if (seconds < 10) {
                time = (m + ":0" + s);
                } else {
                time = (m + ":" + s);
            }
        },1000,1000);
    }
 }

You can find a few good examples of this @

And while, this question is kind of a duplicate of the other questions, I think it is more of an issue with perspective or paradigms that Java has that other languages don't. Typically the use of inner or nested classes are really something you see in day-today Java. However, it is hit or miss with C++ and C#. In some, it is considered really bad practice (PHP), and others it is just simply not allowed (Objective-C).

With that being said, just because one person doesn't like it doesn't mean it shouldn't be used, just that you should review why you are using it, and how it fits into your environment.

share|improve this answer
    
So you've combined by "start" and "task" classes? That's cool and I've learns something, but now how would I go about drawing the timer on my applet? g.drawString(time, 300, 300); doesn't seem to work, I just get errors. –  RJrules64 Jul 14 '14 at 16:28
    
You should be able to use start.time in your draw code to retrieve the string. [Bah Enter commits]. The idea (and this can get to be an in-depth conversation) is that your execution code and your render code are separate. You use your render code to access the data methods behind your execution code. –  Roy Folkker Jul 14 '14 at 16:38
    
What code would I use to seperate the execution code and render code? Could you write it for me please? Sorry I'm new so I don't know how much I am asking of you. If I'm asking too much don't worry about it. –  RJrules64 Jul 14 '14 at 16:41
    
You are not asking too much per-say, but unfortunately, I am unable to quickly answer that right now. If a better answer is not available by this evening (my time), I will try and get something up. –  Roy Folkker Jul 14 '14 at 16:45
    
Thanks a lot! :-) –  RJrules64 Jul 14 '14 at 17:00

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