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I work on Spring MVC + Hibernate application, use MySQL (ver. 5.0.51a) with the InnoDB engine.

The problem appears when I am sending a form with cyrillic characters. As the result, database contains senseless chars in unknown encoding.

All the JSP pages, database (+ tables and fields) created using UTF-8. Hibernate config also contains property which sets encoding to UTF-8.

I had solved this by creating filter which encodes request content with UTF-8. Exemplary code:

…
encoding = "UTF-8";
request.setCharacterEncoding(encoding);
chain.doFilter(request, response);
…

But it visibly slows down the app.

The interesting thing is that executing insert query directly from the app (i.e. running from Eclipse as Java Application) works perfect.

UPD.

As far as I understood, using filter is the only working solution in my case.

I didn't know about standard CharacterEncodingFilter. Use it now, works very well!

<filter>
    <filter-name>CharacterEncodingFilter</filter-name>
    <filter-class>org.springframework.web.filter.CharacterEncodingFilter</filter-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>encoding</param-name>
        <param-value>UTF-8</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>forceEncoding</param-name>
        <param-value>true</param-value>
    </init-param>
</filter>

<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>CharacterEncodingFilter</filter-name>
    <url-pattern>*</url-pattern>
</filter-mapping>
share|improve this question
    
changing the character encoding in the request object like this should not have a visible effect on speed of the application. something else must be going on –  matt b Mar 19 '10 at 1:17
    
have you by any chance declared the doFilter() method to be syncrhonized ? –  Bozho Mar 19 '10 at 6:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your JSP files must be UTF-8 in two ways:

  • the header <%@page pageEncoding="UTF-8" %>
  • their content - right-click > properties in eclipse and make their encoding UTF-8 there (it may refuse to convert it, so cut the current content, change the encoding, and then paste it back)

Then spring has a CharacterEncodingFilter for this case, which shouldn't have any significant performance hit:

<filter>
    <filter-name>CharacterEncodingFilter</filter-name>
    <filter-class>org.springframework.web.filter.CharacterEncodingFilter</filter-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>encoding</param-name>
        <param-value>UTF-8</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>forceEncoding</param-name>
        <param-value>true</param-value>
    </init-param>
</filter>

Actually, no filter should have a significant performance hit, unless its doFilter() method is declared synchronized.

share|improve this answer
    
@Bozko. I have UTF-8 in both the header and the pages. doFilter() method does not contain the keyword «synchronized». It seems like slowing down is just my subjective perception. CharacterEncodingFilter works fine! Thanks. –  0x2D9A3 Mar 19 '10 at 10:10
    
-1 for "If this doesn't work". If your pages are not ISO-8859-1 (at browser side), you MUST use CharacterEncodingFilter for correct processing of non-us-ascii input (unless your servlet container violates the servlet spec here, like Jetty). –  axtavt Mar 19 '10 at 14:13
    
@axtavt I fixed that tiny detail. –  Bozho Mar 19 '10 at 14:40
    
so the filter will convert posted form values or? –  Blankman Mar 19 '10 at 19:51
    
yes, it will. 100% :) –  Bozho Mar 19 '10 at 20:00

It's your price for doing the correct encoding transformation: UTF-8 (request)-> UTF-16 (Java) -> UTF-8 (DB).

I would be surprised though if it (transformation) took more than a few percent of overall request time. If it does, something is done wrong IMHO.

All the JSP pages ... created using UTF-8

Does your container set UTF-8 as page encoding? (See generated page properties). If it does, you don't need to set filter, the browser would submit the form back in UTF-8.

share|improve this answer
    
Browsers usually don't send encoding when submitting a form and servlet container assumes that it's ISO-8859-1, so filter is the only right solution in this case. –  axtavt Mar 19 '10 at 0:52
    
Generated page contains the line <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8"> But, as I mentioned, no success without a filter. If you think the transformation process is kind of precey, what's the better solution in this case? –  0x2D9A3 Mar 19 '10 at 1:36
    
Browsers do send encoding -- the same as the original encoding of the page was, or UTF-8. Otherwise how us, non-Latin1-people, would submit our pity multibyte forms? :D –  Vladimir Dyuzhev Mar 20 '10 at 0:45
    
@Bar, trace HTTP requests (use FireBug or TamperData for Firefox, for instance) and see what's coming from and goes to server. Check out headers for Content-Transfer-Encoding. –  Vladimir Dyuzhev Mar 20 '10 at 0:46

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