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If in my code I do the following snippet:

try {
  doSomething();
} catch (...) {
  doSomethingElse();
  throw;
}

Will the throw rethrow the specific exception caught by the default ellipsis handler?

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1 Answer

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Yes. The exception is active until it's caught, where it becomes inactive. But it lives until the scope of the handler ends. From the standard, emphasis mine:

§15.1/4: The memory for the temporary copy of the exception being thrown is allocated in an unspecified way, except as noted in 3.7.4.1. The temporary persists as long as there is a handler being executed for that exception.

That is:

catch(...)
{ // <--

    /* ... */

} // <--

Between those arrows, you can re-throw the exception. Only when the handlers scope ends does the exception cease to exist.

In fact, in §15.1/6 the example given is nearly the same as your code:

try {
    // ...
}
catch (...) { // catch all exceptions
    // respond (partially) to exception <-- ! :D
    throw; //pass the exception to some
           // other handler
}

Keep in mind if you throw without an active exception, terminate will be called. This cannot be the case for you, being in a handler.


If doSomethingElse() throws and the exception has no corresponding handler, because the original exception is considered handled the new exception will replace it. (As if it had just thrown, begins stack unwinding, etc.)

That is:

void doSomethingElse(void)
{
    try
    {
        throw "this is fine";
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        // the previous exception dies, back to
        // using the original exception
    }

    try
    {
        // rethrow the exception that was
        // active when doSomethingElse was called
        throw; 
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        throw; // and let it go again
    }

    throw "this replaces the old exception";
    // this new one takes over, begins stack unwinding
    // leaves the catch's scope, old exception is done living,
    // and now back to normal exception stuff
}

try
{
    throw "original exception";
}
catch (...)
{
  doSomethingElse();
  throw; // this won't actually be reached,
         // the new exception has begun propagating
}

Of course if nothing throws, throw; will be reached and you'll throw your caught exception as expected.

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What if doSomethingElse() throws something else in the meantime? Curious thing. –  John K Mar 19 '10 at 1:25
    
"and the handler it was caught in ends" sounds confusing. It's not necessary for its close-brace to be reached, according to the paragraph you quoted. –  Potatoswatter Mar 19 '10 at 1:31
    
@jdk: terminate gets called; see the last line of the example, throw 2; where 2 is a new exception being thrown. –  Mike DeSimone Mar 19 '10 at 1:37
    
@Potatoswatter: It could use some rewording. But the "handler execution" stops when the last statement in the scope has been executed. (The scope ends.) –  GManNickG Mar 19 '10 at 1:38
    
"two exceptions active, terminate is called". Um, no. Throwing a different exception replaces the active exception. 15.1/4: "when the [handler] exits by any means other than throw; the temporary object is destroyed". In particular, exiting by throw assignment-expression is "other". You're thinking of throwing from a destructor during unwinding before the handler is executed, and behaviour for that is explicitly defined in 15.2/3. –  Steve Jessop Mar 19 '10 at 2:32
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