Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Could you please help me to configure web.config, so that iis express resolves all urls, beginning form my physical root folder.

for example i want in visual studio to have "webroot" folder for all my web files. C:/dev/myWebMvcApplication/webroot/app/index.html. where: myWebMvcApplication is the folder for my solution, [.sln] and webroot is a physical folder containing all my files,

so that, all urls could look like /localhost:port/app/index.html and not like /localhost:port/webroot/app/index.html

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As of IIS7 changing sites within your server is generally done now in the sites section of applicationHost.config.

<sites>
    <site name="Blah Blah" id="1">
        <application path="/" applicationPool="DefaultAppPool">
            <virtualDirectory path="/" physicalPath="C:/dev/myWebMvcApplication/webroot" />
        </application>
        <bindings>
            <binding protocol="HTTP" bindingInformation="*:80:" />
        </bindings>
     </site>
</sites>

I am assuming you are are talking about changing the root of your webserver so that all applications under your solution share the same base URL. Please let me know if this is an incorrect assumption.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, is there any other way? - that is more source control friendly (portable) ? (so no through applicationHost.config, but through, web.config) ? –  user3834960 Jul 15 '14 at 18:36
    
Unfortunately I know of no way to set a root virtual directory location in your web.config. It's really intended to be done within the IISAdmin management extension. If you're looking to do some form of build/deploy automation a PowerShell script would likely work but that's really a totally different thing. –  Matt T. Jul 15 '14 at 22:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.