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if you do

ipconfig.exe 1> output.log 2>&1

this will direct all output(both stdout and stderr) to "output.log".

However, if you do (changing the order in which you specify desired redirections)

ipconfig.exe 2>&1 1> output.log

this will not achieve the intended effect of printing both output streams to "output.log" because "stderr" in this case will be printed to the console.

I suspect this has to do with the way "cmd" parses commands that gives different meanings depending on the order in which you specify redirects.

If so, what are the semantic rules and where are they documented?

I reckon this is something worth finding out as it could waste people hours by making them scratching their head trying to figure out why their redirection is not working.

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The redirections are simply parsed left to right. Initially stdout and stderr are pointing to the console, so when you redrect stderr to where stdout is currently pointing in the second example, you are directing stderr to the console. You then subsequently redirect stdout to a file. –  Mark Setchell Jul 14 '14 at 22:13
    
ah, that explains it. thank you Mark. –  igbgotiz Jul 14 '14 at 23:13
    
@MarkSetchell - could you please post the answer? I'm posting yours for now but will delete it when you post yours. :) –  Lizz Dec 10 '14 at 4:32
    
My apologies - this one slipped through the net and I have now posted an answer with a little further reference. –  Mark Setchell Dec 10 '14 at 11:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The redirections are simply parsed left to right. Initially stdout and stderr are pointing to the console, so when you redirect stderr to where stdout is currently pointing in the second example, you are directing stderr to the console. You then subsequently redirect stdout to a file.

The explanations and examples here are quite good for further reference.

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