Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a PC on remote connected by network, but it occasionally crashes or is restarted by remote users. After the restart, some services and applications have to be in running status. So I would like to find out the reboot as soon as possible. I think PS may be a good choice with some scripts so that I could make remote call to get the last reboot timestamp information.

Is there any way to get a remote Windows XP last reboot timestamp by using PowerShell 2.0(its remoting feature)?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

You can do this via WMI:

$wmi = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -Computer "RemoteMachine"
$wmi.ConvertToDateTime($wmi.LastBootUpTime)
share|improve this answer
    
how about to get the info from a remote PC? Should I specify a computer name/ip with user/pwd? –  David.Chu.ca Mar 19 '10 at 4:24

For a remote computer:

$wmi = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -Computer RemoteComputerName
$wmi.ConvertToDateTime($wmi.LastBootUpTime)
share|improve this answer

The uptime of the computer in seconds is available in the "System Up Time" performance counter. Though that's probably overkill.

Obviously, for services the easiest thing is to just set their start mode to "Automatic" but if you have other things that need to be running, the easiest way to do that is via the Windows task scheduler: you can set up a schedule that runs when the computer starts up.

share|improve this answer
    
That's true by setting automatic service or schedule tasks. However, the reboot might be caused by network or some other hardware issues, and they may cause services or app not being able to run. That's why I need to get last reboot timestamp and check its changes. –  David.Chu.ca Mar 19 '10 at 4:22
    
You can still use the performance counter then, as a "safety net", I suppose. Performance counters can be read remotely. –  Dean Harding Mar 19 '10 at 4:35

FYI, if you are on the PowerShell Community Extensions 2.0 Beta, you can use Get-Uptime e.g.:

PS> Get-Uptime

Uptime                                LastBootUpTime
------                                --------------
00:44:01.4401754                      3/21/2010 12:07:17 AM
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.