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We can call "Base class methods" in derived class. but Can we call derived class method in base class function?

#include<iostream.h>

class base {

 public:

   void print()
   {
     cout<<"base class";
   }

};

 class derived : public base

 {

  public:
    void print()
    {

            cout<<"derived class";

    }

 };

How to call this derived class print() function in Base class?

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for virtual functions? –  T.C. Jul 15 at 6:22
    
Base class don't know anything about derived class. Your question is incorrect. Please try to correct your question. –  IAmDav Jul 15 at 6:32

3 Answers 3

You cannot call a normal method defined in derived class from base class. What you can do is add a virtual (possibly pure) method in base class, provide implementation in derived class. You can call this method from base.

class Base{
public:
 virtual void foo(){cout<<"Hello";};
 void bar() { foo();}
};

class Derived: public Base{
 public:
 void foo() override{ cout<<"Hi";}
};

int main() {
 Base* b1 = new Derived();
 b1->bar(); //will call Derived::foo()

 Base* b2=new Base();
 b2->bar(); // will call Base::foo()
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for override. The other possible alternative is CRTP, but that's probably too advanced... –  T.C. Jul 15 at 6:36

You can call derived class's method from base class method on a derived class object, if it's a virtual method:

class base {
  public:
    void doSomething() { 
      print();  
    }
    virtual void print() {
      cout<<"base class";
    }
};

class derived : public base {
  public:
    virtual void print() {
      cout<<"derived class";
    }
};

int main() {
  derived d;
  base* pb = &d;
  pb->doSomething();
}

It is known as Template method pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
The key here is that print() isn't really a derived-class method; it's declared in the base class so all instances (of base or derived) must have it. The derived class is just providing a different implementation. –  Wyzard Jul 15 at 6:43

If you know for certain that all instantiations of base will be as the base class of derived (as might be the case in a use of the Curiously Recurring Template Pattern), you can simply static_cast this to derived*:

#include <iostream>

class base {
public:
    void call_derived_print();
    void print()
    {
        std::cout<<"base class";
    }
};

class derived : public base
{
public:
    void print()
    {
       std::cout<<"derived class";
    }
};

void base::call_derived_print() {
    //undefined behaviour unless the most-derived type of `*this`
    //is `derived` or is a subtype of `derived`.
    static_cast<derived*>(this)->print();
}
share|improve this answer
    
to me this is unsafe. the Base::print should be pure virtual, or use CRTP in proper way. people like to do all kinds of things –  Rakib Jul 15 at 6:41
    
@RakibulHasan: It's perfectly safe as long as the constraints listed in the answer are met. Sometimes you don't want to pay the cost of a virtual call. –  Mankarse Jul 15 at 6:43
1  
that's the point, it is safe if constraints are met, why leave hole? Rather you can go for template. –  Rakib Jul 15 at 6:44
    
@RakibulHasan: Since base and derived are clearly just dummy names, there is nothing here to say that this won't use CRTP in a proper way. There are already 4 answers mentioning virtual functions, which I agree are a better solution in most cases, so there didn't seem to be a need for another answer talking about those. This answer is for if there is some constraint that requires print to be non-virtual. –  Mankarse Jul 15 at 6:46

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