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I know you can do something like this:

readlines(FileName) ->
    {ok, Device} = file:open(FileName, [read]),
    get_all_lines(Device, []).

get_all_lines(Device, Accum) ->
    case io:get_line(Device, "") of
        eof  -> file:close(Device), Accum;
        Line -> get_all_lines(Device, Accum ++ [Line])
    end.

: Is there a one liner BIF that can do this too?

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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

file:read_file/1 is what you are looking for. Just for teaching purpose, Accum ++ [Line] is bad practice. Problem is that left argument of ++ is copied and right is used as is. In your code you will copy bigger and bigger part in each iteration. Solution is lists:reverse(Line,Accum) and than return lists:reverse(Accum) in your eof branch (Or [Line|Accum] and lists:append(lists:reverse(Accum)) at the eof or use binary which have better append operation or ...). Another way is not using tail recursive function which is not so bad as seems at first time according to Myth: Tail-recursive functions are MUCH faster than recursive functions.

So your readlines/1 function should look like

readlines(FileName) ->
    {ok, Device} = file:open(FileName, [read]),
    try get_all_lines(Device)
      after file:close(Device)
    end.

get_all_lines(Device) ->
    case io:get_line(Device, "") of
        eof  -> [];
        Line -> Line ++ get_all_lines(Device)
    end.
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Ok, thanks, good advice ! –  Zubair Mar 19 '10 at 18:34
    
Is not file:read_file a bit dangerous? I mean it is using file_server which looks like it's blocking (gen_server which is wrapping prim_file). It looks like prim_file or file_io_server could be better solutions. –  mkorszun Nov 28 '13 at 10:17
    
I have not experienced or heard about any problem with file:read_file. I don't understand what it should blocking. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Nov 28 '13 at 23:18
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You could leverage file:read_file/1 and binary:split/3 to do this work in two steps:

readlines(FileName) ->
    {ok, Data} = file:read_file(FileName),
    binary:split(Data, [<<"\n">>], [global]).
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