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I have a dataframe, with multiple columns called "data" which looks like this:

Preferences  Status      Gender  
8a 8b 9a     Employed    Female  
10b 11c 9b   Unemployed  Male  
11a 11c 8e   Student     Female  

That is, each customer selected 3 preferences and specified other information such as Status and Gender. Each preference is given by a [number][letter] combination, and there are c. 30 possible preferences. The possible preferences are:

8[a - c]  
9[a - k]  
10[a - d]  
11[a - c]  
12[a - i]  

I want to count the number of occurrences of each preference, under certain conditions for the other columns - eg. for all women.

The output will ideally be a dataframe that looks like this:

Preference   Female  Male  Employed  Unemployed  Student
8a           1034    934   234       495         203
8b           539     239   609       394         235
8c           124     395   684       94          283
9a           120     999   895       945         345
9b           978     385   596       923         986

etc.

What's the most efficient way to achieve this?
Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

I am assuming you are starting with something that looks like this:

mydf <- structure(list(
  Preferences = c("8a 8b 9a", "10b 11c 9b", "11a 11c 8e"), 
  Status = c("Employed", "Unemployed", "Student"), 
  Gender = c("Female", "Male", "Female")), 
  .Names = c("Preferences", "Status", "Gender"), 
  class = c("data.frame"), row.names = c(NA, -3L))
mydf
#   Preferences     Status Gender
# 1    8a 8b 9a   Employed Female
# 2  10b 11c 9b Unemployed   Male
# 3  11a 11c 8e    Student Female

If that's the case, you need to "split" the "Preferences" column (by spaces), transform the data into a "long" form, and then reshape it to a wide form, tabulating while you do so.

With the right tools, this is pretty straightforward.

library(devtools)
library(data.table)
library(reshape2)
source_gist(11380733) # for `cSplit`

dcast.data.table(                                # Step 3--aggregate to wide form
  melt(                                          # Step 2--convert to long form
    cSplit(mydf, "Preferences", " ", "long"),    # Step 1--split "Preferences"
    id.vars = "Preferences"), 
  Preferences ~ value, fun.aggregate = length)
#    Preferences Employed Female Male Student Unemployed
# 1:         10b        0      0    1       0          1
# 2:         11a        0      1    0       1          0
# 3:         11c        0      1    1       1          1
# 4:          8a        1      1    0       0          0
# 5:          8b        1      1    0       0          0
# 6:          8e        0      1    0       1          0
# 7:          9a        1      1    0       0          0
# 8:          9b        0      0    1       0          1

I also tried a dplyr + tidyr approach, which looks like the following:

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

mydf %>%
  separate(Preferences, c("P_1", "P_2", "P_3")) %>% ## splitting things
  gather(Pref, Pvals, P_1:P_3) %>%      # stack the preference columns
  gather(Var, Val, Status:Gender) %>%   # stack the status/gender columns
  group_by(Pvals, Val) %>%              # group by these new columns
  summarise(count = n()) %>%            # aggregate the numbers of each
  spread(Val, count)                    # spread the values out
# Source: local data table [8 x 6]
# Groups: 
# 
#   Pvals Employed Female Male Student Unemployed
# 1   10b       NA     NA    1      NA          1
# 2   11a       NA      1   NA       1         NA
# 3   11c       NA      1    1       1          1
# 4    8a        1      1   NA      NA         NA
# 5    8b        1      1   NA      NA         NA
# 6    8e       NA      1   NA       1         NA
# 7    9a        1      1   NA      NA         NA
# 8    9b       NA     NA    1      NA          1

Both approaches are actually pretty quick. Test it with some better sample data than what you shared, like this:

preferences <- c(paste0(8, letters[1:3]),
                 paste0(9, letters[1:11]),
                 paste0(10, letters[1:4]),
                 paste0(11, letters[1:3]),
                 paste0(12, letters[1:9]))
set.seed(1)
nrow <- 10000

mydf <- data.frame(
  Preferences = vapply(replicate(nrow, 
                                 sample(preferences, 3, FALSE), 
                                 FALSE), 
                       function(x) paste(x, collapse = " "), 
                       character(1L)),
  Status = sample(c("Employed", "Unemployed", "Student"), nrow, TRUE),
  Gender = sample(c("Male", "Female"), nrow, TRUE)
)
share|improve this answer
    
This is brilliant, thank you. I haven't tried the second solution yet but the first worked perfectly. –  user3840465 Jul 16 at 10:12
    
@user3840465, Great. If the answer solved your problem, do consider accepting it or voting it up. By the way, in the future, you might want to post reproducible code in your questions, like I did with generating sample data in my answer. Welcome to Stack Overflow! –  Ananda Mahto Jul 16 at 10:26
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