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The following code...

type 'a osResult =
  Success of 'a
| Error of string


let errorCatcher f =
  try
    let result = f () in
    Success result
  with Unix.Unix_error (code, fun_name, arg) ->
    Error(String.concat ":" [(Unix.error_message code); fun_name; arg])

let my_getcwd () = 
  errorCatcher (fun () -> Unix.getcwd ())

let _ =
  print_endline "The Start";
  let result = my_getcwd () |> function
  | Success folder -> Printf.sprintf "getcwd:\n\t%s\n" folder
  | Error errMessage -> Printf.sprintf "getcwd (error):\n\t%s\n" errMessage
  in
  print_string result ;
  print_endline "The End."
;;

...compiles fine:

$ corebuild -tag debug test1.native

...and runs fine:

$ ./test1.native 
The Start
getcwd:
        /home/ttsiod/work/byePythonHelloOCaml
The End.

But if I change the main body to this:

let _ =
  print_endline "The Start";
  my_getcwd () |> function
  | Success folder -> Printf.printf "getcwd:\n\t%s\n" folder
  | Error errMessage -> Printf.printf "getcwd (error):\n\t%s\n" errMessage
  ;
  print_endline "The End."
;;

... then apparently the last print statement ("The End") gets lost or something...

$ ./test2.native 
The Start
getcwd:
        /home/ttsiod/work/byePythonHelloOCaml

Initially, I thought this is a case of stdout buffering not being flushed.

But the docs of print_endline clearly claim that it flushes stdout, so I am at a loss - and adding "flush" didn't help, either:

let _ =
  print_endline "The Start";
  my_getcwd () |> function
  | Success folder -> Printf.printf "getcwd:\n\t%s\n" folder
  | Error errMessage -> Printf.printf "getcwd (error):\n\t%s\n" errMessage
  ;
  print_endline "The End." ;
  flush stdout
;;

Help?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The print_endline is treated as part of the Error case. From the indentation, this is clearly not what you meant, but unfortunately the OCaml compiler doesn't warn about this.

You can use begin and end (or just parentheses) to make it work:

let () =
  print_endline "The Start";
  my_getcwd () |> begin function
  | Success folder -> Printf.printf "getcwd:\n\t%s\n" folder
  | Error errMessage -> Printf.printf "getcwd (error):\n\t%s\n" errMessage
  end;
  print_endline "The End." ;
  flush stdout

Alternatively, without using ;,

let () =
  let () = print_endline "The Start" in
  let () = match my_getcwd () with
    | Success folder -> Printf.printf "getcwd:\n\t%s\n" folder
    | Error errMessage -> Printf.printf "getcwd (error):\n\t%s\n" errMessage
  in
  let () = print_endline "The End." in
  flush stdout
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! By the way, as you can probably guess from the folder name I am working in - "byePythonHelloOCaml" - your blog posts have won at least one convert :-) –  ttsiodras Jul 15 '14 at 12:17
    
The tool that I expect to warn me when I make this mistake is Emacs+Tuareg mode, which indents print_endline "The End." so as to show that it belongs to the case above. –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 15 '14 at 12:19
    
(and using |> to send a value through an anonymous function may be a little too cute for its own good. Just because you can write this does not mean that you should) –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 15 '14 at 12:20
    
@Pascal: I am in "re-learning-OCaml-mode", so all bets are off :-) In my defense though, the normal "match my_getcwd () with | Success -> Printf ... | Error -> Printf , I would have still faced the same error. I wish OCaml spotted this - a warning would have sufficed :-( –  ttsiodras Jul 15 '14 at 12:26
2  
I've always tried to limit my use of ;, even for the sake of a line of let () =. The let () = doesn't add much visual overhead, and reduces the number of begin ... end blocks (which I favor over parens). –  nlucaroni Jul 15 '14 at 13:10

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