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I want to read out a directory recursively to print the data-structure in an HTML-Page with Template::Toolkit. But I'm hanging in how to save the Paths and Files in a form that can be read our easy.

My idea started like this

sub list_dirs{

     my ($rootPath) = @_;
     my (@paths);

     $rootPath .= '/' if($rootPath !~ /\/$/);

     for my $eachFile (glob($path.'*'))
     {

         if(-d $eachFile)
         {
              push (@paths, $eachFile);

              &list_dirs($eachFile);
          }
          else
          {
              push (@files, $eachFile);
          }
     }

 return @paths;
}

How could I solve this problem?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

This should do the trick

 use strict;
 use warnings;
 use File::Find qw(finddepth);
 my @files;
 finddepth(sub {
      return if($_ eq '.' || $_ eq '..');
      push @files, $File::Find::name;
 }, '/my/dir/to/search');
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so, glob actually doesn't support recursive listing of files, right? –  Baiyan Huang Aug 22 '12 at 23:38
    
that's correct, it'll only get the files from the given directory. –  Htbaa Aug 23 '12 at 7:23

You should always use strict and warnings to help you debug your code. Perl would have warned you for example that @files is not declared. But the real problem with your function is that you declare a lexical variable @paths on every recursive call to list_dirs and don't push the return value back after the recursion step.

push @paths, list_dir($eachFile)

If you don't want to install additional modules, the following solution should probably help you:

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find qw(find);

sub list_dirs {
        my @dirs = @_;
        my @files;
        find({ wanted => sub { push @files, $_ } , no_chdir => 1 }, @dirs);
        return @files;
}
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with this routine I only get one result, and this is the directory I give the routine to start. –  Przemek Mar 19 '10 at 10:03
    
Can you show me the code you use to examine this? It's working just fine here. Maybe test it with "use Dumper; print Dumper list_dirs '/home'". –  mdom Mar 19 '10 at 10:29

The answer by mdom explains how your initial attempt went astray. I would also suggest that you consider friendlier alternatives to File::Find. CPAN has several options. Here's one.

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find::Rule;
my @paths = File::Find::Rule->in(@ARGV);

Also see here:

And here is a rewrite of your recursive solution. Things to note: use strict; use warnings; and the use of a scoping block to create a static variable for the subroutine.

use strict;
use warnings;

print $_, "\n" for dir_listing(@ARGV);

{
    my @paths;
    sub dir_listing {
        my ($root) = @_;
        $root .= '/' unless $root =~ /\/$/;
        for my $f (glob "$root*"){
            push @paths, $f;
            dir_listing($f) if -d $f;
        }
        return @paths;
    }
}
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I think you have problem in the following line in your code

for my $eachFile (glob($path.'*'))

You change the $path variable into $rootpath.

It will store the path correctly.

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I use this script to remove hidden files (created by Mac OS X) from my USB Pendrive, where I usually use it to listen music in the car, and any file ending with ".mp3", even when it starts with "._", will be listed in the car audio list.

#!/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Find qw(find);

sub list_dirs {
        my @dirs = @_;
        my @files;
        find({ wanted => sub { push @files, $_ } , no_chdir => 1 }, @dirs);
        return @files;
}

if ( ! @ARGV || !$ARGV[0] ) {
  print "** Invalid dir!\n";
  exit ;
}


if ( $ARGV[0] !~ /\/Volumes\/\w/s ) {
  print "** Dir should be at /Volume/... > $ARGV[0]\n";
  exit ;
}

my @paths = list_dirs($ARGV[0]) ;

foreach my $file (@paths) {
  my ($filename) = ( $file =~ /([^\\\/]+)$/s ) ;

  if ($filename =~ /^\._/s ) {
    unlink $file ;
    print "rm> $file\n" ;
  }
}
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you can use this method as recursive file search that separate specific file types,

my @files;
push @files, list_dir($outputDir);

sub list_dir {
        my @dirs = @_;
        my @files;
        find({ wanted => sub { push @files, glob "\"$_/*.txt\"" } , no_chdir => 1 }, @dirs);
        return @files;
}
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