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I'm seeing some slow performance on a SQL Server 2005 database. I've been doing some research regarding SQL Server performance but I'm having difficulty fully understanding the output of SHOWCONTIG and would be very grateful if someone could have a look and offer some suggestions to improve performance.

TABLE level scan performed.

  • Pages Scanned................................: 19298

  • Extents Scanned..............................: 2424

  • Extent Switches..............................: 3829

  • Avg. Pages per Extent........................: 8.0

  • Scan Density [Best Count:Actual Count].......: 65.16% [2439:3830]

  • Logical Scan Fragmentation ..................: 8.40%

  • Extent Scan Fragmentation ...................: 35.15%

  • Avg. Bytes Free per Page.....................: 912.1

  • Avg. Page Density (full).....................: 88.41%

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What are you trying to optimise for? Reads or Writes? –  Martin Smith Mar 19 '10 at 9:59
    
Reads the table has about 100k rows and is added to daily. –  user169743 Mar 19 '10 at 11:15
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It gives information about how the table looks on disc - and is extremely useless do locate your performance bottleneck. Your db could need some optimization, but I doubt it is the source of your problems. http://www.sql-server-performance.com/articles/dba/dt_dbcc_showcontig_p1.aspx has info how to understand it.

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Granted I'm not a DBA but it seems logical that if the records are organised better on the disk that would boost reads? –  user169743 Mar 20 '10 at 11:47
    
Not to a degree very visible unless the scenario is really specific and the raid conroller is utter crap. Normally you start from the other side - finding out what queries are slow, then WHY they are slow. A missing index, faster discs to start with, different SQL etc. are way more likely to make a significant difference. Plus making sure the person installing SQL Server was not the usual idiot setting up terrible partitioning (THAT can slow you down UP TO 40%) and a proper file struture on top of it ;) –  TomTom Mar 20 '10 at 13:21
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