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How can I set cron to run certain commands every one and a half hours?

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8 Answers 8

That's not possible with a single expression in normal cron.

The best you could do without modifying the code is:

0 0,3,6,9,12,15,18,21 * * * [cmd]

30 1,4,7,10,13,16,19,22 * * * [cmd]

These might be compressible, depending on the version of cron you have to:

0 */3 * * * [cmd]

30 1-23/3 * * * [cmd]

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Is there a good reason why you can't use 1 hour or 2 hours? It would be simpler for sure.

I haven't tried this personally, but you can find some info here on getting cron to run every 90 minutes: http://keithdevens.com/weblog/archive/2004/May/05/cron

An excert from the above link:

0 0,3,6,9,12,15,18,21 * * * <commands>
30 1,4,7,10,13,16,19,22 * * * <commands>
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Which requirement? First sentence questions the necessity of 1.5 hours, the second provides a blog post with information on how to do it every 1.5 hours. –  vfilby Oct 29 '08 at 17:24
1  
Upvoted because the blog post answers the question correctly. –  Paul Tomblin Oct 29 '08 at 17:32
    
It didn't clearly reference that when I down-voted it. It has been edited since to make it clear that the link is to a potential solution for the 90 minute question. –  Alnitak Oct 29 '08 at 17:35
1  
Aye, I clarified the post. –  vfilby Oct 29 '08 at 17:46

Two lines in the crontab. Along the lines of:

0 0,3,6,9,12,15,18,21 * * * /usr/bin/foo
30 1,4,7,10,13,16,19,22 * * * /usr/bin/foo
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You could do it with two crontab entries. Each runs every three hours and they are offset by 90 minutes something like this:

0 0,3,6,9,12,15,18,21 * * *

30 1,4,7,10,13,16,19,22 * * *

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You could also use fcron which also accepts more complex time specifications such as :

@ 01h30 my_cmd
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#! /bin/sh

# Minute Cron
# Usage: cron-min start
# Copyright 2014 by Marc Perkel
# docs at http://wiki.junkemailfilter.com/index.php/How_to_run_a_Linux_script_every_few_seconds_under_cron"
# Free to use with attribution

# Run this script under Cron once a minute

basedir=/etc/cron-min

if [ $# -gt 0 ]
then
   echo
   echo "cron-min by Marc Perkel"
   echo
   echo "This program is used to run all programs in a directory in parallel every X minutes."
   echo
   echo "Usage: cron-min"
   echo
   echo "The scheduling is done by creating directories with the number of minutes as part of the"
   echo "directory name. The minutes do not have to evenly divide into 60 or be less than 60."
   echo
   echo "Examples:"
   echo "  /etc/cron-min/1      # Executes everything in that directory every 1  minute"
   echo "  /etc/cron-min/5      # Executes everything in that directory every 5  minutes"
   echo "  /etc/cron-min/13     # Executes everything in that directory every 13 minutes"
   echo "  /etc/cron-min/90     # Executes everything in that directory every 90 minutes"
   echo
   exit
fi

for dir in $basedir/* ; do
   minutes=${dir##*/}
   if [ $(( ($(date +%s) / 60) % $minutes )) -eq 0 ]
   then
      for program in $basedir/$minutes/* ; do
     if [ -x $program ]
     then
        $program &> /dev/null &
     fi
      done
   fi
done
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*/10 * * * * root perl -e 'exit(time()%(90*60)>60)' && command

90 — it is one and a half hour in minutes

"> 60" — I give to cron ability to delay the start of script during a minute

Also with help of this hack you can set any period with a minute resolution

For example start the script every 71 minutes

* * * * * root perl -e 'exit(time()%(71*60)>60)' && command

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added the following to my crontab and is working

15 */1   * * *   root    /usr/bin/some_script.sh >> /tmp/something.log
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Could you expand more on why this is good solution. –  LIUFA Jun 27 at 11:07

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