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I'm getting a JVM error while running multiple concurrent vdbench instances with a high queue depth (256).

Output from localhost-0.stdout.html:

19:49:13.281 19:49:13.281 Started 1 Workload Generator threads.
19:49:13.345 19:49:13.345 Out of memory:
19:49:13.345
19:49:13.345             modify the vdbench script and increase the '-Xmx512m' value where 512m equals the java heap size requested.
19:49:13.345 19:49:13.345 If the error message says 'unable to create new native thread' modify the vdbench script adding '-Xss256k' or lower value for the java thread stack size.
19:49:13.345
19:49:13.345
19:49:13.345 19:49:13.345 Examples are for Solaris. For other platforms see the Java provider's documentation
19:49:13.346 19:49:13.345 Memory total Java heap:  253.000 MB; Free:  221.013 MB; Used:   31.987 MB;
19:49:13.346 java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: unable to create new native thread
19:49:13.346    at java.lang.Thread.start0(Native Method)
19:49:13.347    at java.lang.Thread.start(Thread.java:713)
19:49:13.347    at Vdb.SlaveWorker.StartIoThreads(SlaveWorker.java:329)
19:49:13.347    at Vdb.SlaveWorker.doRegularWorkload(SlaveWorker.java:211)
19:49:13.347    at Vdb.SlaveWorker.run(SlaveWorker.java:129)
19:49:13.347 java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: unable to create new native thread
19:49:13.347    at java.lang.Thread.start0(Native Method)
19:49:13.347    at java.lang.Thread.start(Thread.java:713)
19:49:13.347 19:49:13.347 common.failure(): System.exit(-99)
19:49:13.347    at Vdb.SlaveWorker.StartIoThreads(SlaveWorker.java:329)
19:49:13.347    at Vdb.SlaveWorker.doRegularWorkload(SlaveWorker.java:211)
19:49:13.347    at Vdb.SlaveWorker.run(SlaveWorker.java:129)

Though I have tried changing values in _JAVA_OPTIONS with '-Xmx512m, -Xss256k(minimum possible), -Xms256m', the error still persists. Does anyone have any experience with this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've found out the solution to this. Just in case anyone where to drop by.

The number of queue depth, or Threads, is limited to the max user processes allowed by the system (default is 1024 for normal users). In Linux, you can check your max user processes limit by:

# ulimit -a 
core file size          (blocks, -c) 0 
data seg size           (kbytes, -d) unlimited 
file size               (blocks, -f) unlimited 
pending signals                 (-i) 8191 
max locked memory       (kbytes, -l) 32 
max memory size         (kbytes, -m) unlimited 
open files                      (-n) 1024 
pipe size            (512 bytes, -p) 8 
POSIX message queues     (bytes, -q) 819200 
stack size              (kbytes, -s) 8192 
cpu time               (seconds, -t) unlimited 
max user processes              (-u) 1024
virtual memory          (kbytes, -v) unlimited 
file locks                      (-x) unlimited 

Raising this limit solved my issue. You can raise the limit by issuing:

ulimit -u 4096

Or of you are using CentOS, edit /etc/security/limits.d/90-nproc.conf and change the line to:

* soft nproc 4096

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