Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm moving my first steps with Ada, and I'm finding that I struggle to understand how to do common, even banal, operations that in other languages would be immediate.

In this case, I defined the following task type (and access type so I can create new instances):

task type Passenger(
                       Name : String_Ref;
                       Workplace_Station : String_Ref;
                       Home_Station : String_Ref
   );

   type Passenger_Ref is access all Passenger;

As you can see, it's a simple task that has 3 discriminants that can be passed to it when creating an instance. String_Ref is defined as:

   type String_Ref is access all String;

and I use it because apparently you cannot use "normal" types as task discriminants, only references or primitive types.

So I want to create an instance of such a task, but whatever I do, I get an error. I cannot pass the strings directly by simply doing:

  Passenger1 := new Passenger(Name => "foo", Workplace_Station => "man", Home_Station => "bar");

Because those are strings and not references to strings, fair enough. So I tried:

task body Some_Task_That_Tries_To_Use_Passenger is
          Passenger1 : Passenger_Ref;
          Name1 : aliased String := "Foo";
          Home1 : aliased String := "Man";
          Work1 : aliased String := "Bar";

    begin

          Passenger1 := new Passenger(Name => Name1'Access, Workplace_Station => Work1'Access, Home_Station => Home1'Access);

But this doesn't work either, as, from what I understand, the Home1/Name1/Work1 variables are local to task Some_Task_That_Tries_To_Use_Passenger and so cannot be used by Passenger's "constructor".

I don't understand how I have to do it to be honest. I've used several programming languages in the past, but I never had so much trouble passing a simple String to a constructor, I feel like a total idiot but I don't understand why such a common operation would be so complicated, I'm sure I'm approaching the problem incorrectly, please enlighten me and show me the proper way to do this, because I'm going crazy :D

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, I agree it is a serious problem with the language that discriminates of task and record types have to be discrete. Fortunately there is a simple solution for task types -- the data can be passed via an "entry" point.

with Ada.Strings.Unbounded; use Ada.Strings.Unbounded;
procedure Main is
  task type Task_Passenger is
      entry Construct(Name, Workplace, Home : in String);
    end Passenger;
  task body Task_Passenger is
    N, W, H : Unbounded_String;
    begin
      accept Construct(Name, Workplace, Home : in String) do
          N := To_Unbounded_String(Name);
          W := To_Unbounded_String(Workplace);
          H := To_Unbounded_String(Home);
        end Construct;
      --...
    end Passenger;
  Passenger : Task_Passenger;
  begin
    Passenger.Construct("Any", "length", "strings!");
    --...
  end Main;
share|improve this answer
    
Seems to work perfectly thanks – Master_T Jul 16 '14 at 14:50

Ada doesn't really have constructors. In other languages, a constructor is, in essence, a method that takes parameters and has a body that does stuff with those parameters. Trying to get discriminants to serve as a constructor doesn't work well, since there's no subprogram body to do anything with the discriminants. Maybe it looks like it should, because the syntax involves a type followed by a list of discriminant values in parentheses and separated by commas. But that's a superficial similarity. The purpose of discriminants isn't to emulate constructors.

For a "normal" record type, the best substitute for a constructor is a function that returns an object of the type. (Think of this as similar to using a static "factory method" instead of a constructor in a language like Java.) The function can take String parameters or parameters of any other type.

For a task type, it's a little trickier, but you can write a function that returns an access to a task.

type Passenger_Acc is access all Passenger;
function Make_Passenger (Name : String;
                         Workplace_Station : String;
                         Home_Station : String) return Passenger_Acc;

To implement it, you'll need to define an entry in the Passenger task (see Roger Wilco's answer), and then you can use it in the body:

function Make_Passenger (Name : String;
                         Workplace_Station : String;
                         Home_Station : String) return Passenger_Acc is
    Result : Passenger_Acc;
begin
    Result := new Passenger;
    Result.Construct (Name, Workplace_Station, Home_Station);
    return Result;
end Make_Passenger;

(You have to do this by returning a task access. I don't think you can get the function to return a task itself, because you'd have to use an extended return to set up the task object and the task object isn't activated until after the function returns and thus can't accept an entry.)

share|improve this answer
    
You say using discriminates as a constructor doesn't work well. But, are there any technical reasons it is not allowed? Would there be any other way of passing in a bounded string without using a pointer or unbounded string besides a discriminate? – Roger Wilco Jul 15 '14 at 22:42
    
@RogerWilco Discriminants' purpose is to parameterize a type, not to pass in a value to a type. It's hard for me to explain the distinction, but it's there. Passing a value into a constructor (in some other language) is more akin to specifying the initial value of a record field. We don't use discriminants for that in Ada. That isn't what they're for. There's really not much point in answering a question like "Is there any technical reason why we can't twist feature A to act like some totally different feature B?" – ajb Jul 15 '14 at 23:08
    
I see. You could pass in a number to a record which could then serve as part of a range to define the length of some bounded type like type A(N : Integer) is record Name : String(1..N); ... end record; which is proper Ada, but actually passing in the bounded type is not allowed. I am arguing it is useful because creating a string component in a record requires counting the number of characters you wanted for a component (Ex "Name") and then assigning with the proper length like Rec_A : A(3) := (Name => "123"); versus Rec_A : A("123"); – Roger Wilco Jul 16 '14 at 0:27
    
@RogerWilco You may want to say Rec_A : A("123");, but that isn't Ada. But Rec_A : A := Create_A("123"); works great, if you write a function Create_A, just like you'd have to write a constructor in some other language. What you'd like to do just isn't part of the Ada language. Period. – ajb Jul 16 '14 at 1:23

You say

"I don't understand how I have to do it to be honest. I've used several programming languages in the past, but I never had so much trouble passing a simple String to a constructor, I feel like a total idiot but I don't understand why such a common operation would be so complicated, I'm sure I'm approaching the problem incorrectly, please enlighten me and show me the proper way to do this, because I'm going crazy :D"

Ada's access types are often a source of confusion. The main issue is that Ada doesn't have automatic garbage collection, and wants to ensure you can't suffer from the problem of returning pointers to local variables. The combination of these two results in a curious set of rules that force you to design your solution carefully.

If you are sure your code is good, then you can always used 'Unrestricted_Access on an aliased String. This puts all the responsibility on you to ensure the accessed variable won't disappear from underneath the task though.

share|improve this answer

It doesn't have to be all that complicated. You can use an anonymous access type and allocate the strings on demand, but please consider if you really want the strings to be discriminants.

Here is a complete, working example:

with Ada.Text_IO;

procedure String_Discriminants is
   task type Demo (Name : not null access String);

   task body Demo is
   begin
      Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line ("Demo task named """ & Name.all & """.");
   exception
      when others =>
         Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line ("Demo task terminated by an exception.");
   end Demo;

   Run_Demo    : Demo (new String'("example 1"));
   Second_Demo : Demo (new String'("example 2"));
begin
   null;
end String_Discriminants;

Another option is to declare the strings as aliased constants in a library level package, but then you are quite close to just having an enumerated discriminant, and should consider that option carefully before discarding it.

share|improve this answer

I think another solution would be the following:

task body Some_Task_That_Tries_To_Use_Passenger is
      Name1      : aliased String := "Foo";
      Home1      : aliased String := "Man";
      Work1      : aliased String := "Bar";
      Passenger1 : aliased Passenger(
                         Name              => Name1'Access,
                         Workplace_Station => Work1'Access,
                         Home_Station      => Home1'Access
                       );

begin
 --...
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.