Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a short variable (16 bits) and an index (unsigned char). I need a macro that returns the indexth in my variable data. This is what I got:

#define GETBIT(data, index) data & 1 << index

And how I use it:

unsigned char i;
short * twobytes = (short *) calloc(1, sizeof(short));
twobytes =  ((char * )buffer + *currentIndex);
while (codeLength != 0)
{
    i = GETBIT(code, codeLength--);
    *twobytes = SETBIT(*twobytes, *currentBitIndex, i);
    (*currentBitIndex)++;
    if (*currentBitIndex == 8) {
        (*currentIndex)++;
        (*currentBitIndex) %= 8;
    }
}

For some reason i always equals to 0 in my test cases, where it sometimes should equal 1.

What am I doing wrong and how should I fix it?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What is the value of code? –  interjay Jul 15 at 17:42
1  
#define GETBIT(data, index) data & (1 << index) –  dari Jul 15 at 17:43
    
In the first case 00 and in the second one 01, in both cases I get just zeroes. –  shoham Jul 15 at 17:43
    
@dari Still no difference. –  shoham Jul 15 at 17:44
1  
You're not reading the rightmost bit. –  interjay Jul 15 at 17:44

2 Answers 2

Nevermind, thanks, instead of codeLength-- I should've done --codeLength.

share|improve this answer

Example:

$ cat qq.c 
#include <stdio.h>

#define GETBIT(data, index) ((data & (1 << index)) == 0 ? 0 : 1)

int main() {
    const int x = 14;
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
        printf("%d ", GETBIT(x, i));
    }
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}

Run:

$ gcc -Wall qq.c && ./a.out 
0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
share|improve this answer
    
#define GETBIT(data, index) (((uintmax_t)(data) >> (index)) & 1) is a little more general and a little simpler. If you are sure that the data is never any larger than int, then unsigned instead of uintmax_t. It's generally worth avoiding shifts of signed values ! –  gmch Jul 16 at 0:07
    
stackoverflow.com/a/4009954/2557000 (excerpt 6.5.7/4). But, of course, bitwise operations require to be very careful :) –  paq Jul 16 at 10:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.