Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

When facing the problem of validating a property in a JSF2 application there are two main approaches.

Defining the validation on the ManagedBean using an Annotation

@ManagedBean
public class MyBean {
    @Size(max=8)
    private String s;

    // Getters setters and other stuff.
}

or declaring it on the jsf page:

<h:inputText value="#{myBean.s}">
    <f:validateLength maximum="8"/>
</h:inputText>

It happens that I can't decide for none of them. The first one is nice because it removes some code from the jsf pages (which is always good since those pages are not eye friendly by definition) but makes harder to see 'at a glance' what's going on with the page when checking the jsf file.

Which one do you think is clearer? Nicer? Better?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I would pump for validation on the ManagedBean, this removes logic from the JSF the VIEW in model view Controller. and should keep the JSF souly responsible for displaying the Model. Also having this on the managed bean ensures that where ever this is updated validation is applied. This is more DRY(Don't repeat yourself).

share|improve this answer
1  
Still in most cases you have to repeat in gui, for example restricting maxlength or size or any other visal values to the same values as used in validation. –  djmj Jan 31 '13 at 10:57
    
@David Waters, are both bean validation and jsf validation occurs in same lifecycle or in different lifecycles, i mean is jsf validation occurs before bean validation ? and is jsf validation occurs in client side ? –  MahmoudS Jun 30 '13 at 15:53
    
@MahmoudSaleh - Hi Mahmoud, Can I suggest asking your question as a question not a comment, you will get a much better reaction and answers from a much wider range of people. –  David Waters Jun 30 '13 at 21:13

There is another advantage of the managedBean approach. If the information being displayed by the JSF is also available via a web service (WS) then the actual validation code can be factored out into a validation class and used for both the JSF and the WS ensuring that all information in the system is valid.

share|improve this answer

Richfaces allows you to use them together. See <rich:graphValidator> (and beanValidator as well).

These tags say: "apply JSF validation based on javax.validation (or Hibernate validator) rules".

share|improve this answer
    
are both bean validation and jsf validation occurs in same lifecycle or in different lifecycles, i mean is jsf validation occurs before bean validation ? and is jsf validation occurs in client side ? –  MahmoudS Jun 30 '13 at 15:54

I might prefer JSF validation because, I am unable to provide resource bundle error messages as part of bean validations. For example you can not do this

@NotNull(message = ResourceBundleHelper.getString("error_message"))

Because "Compile constants can only be primitives and Strings". There are work around to define the constant messages but that will look ugly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.